Teachers and scientists work together on the Lake Guardian 

The Lake Guardian is currently in its winter home, nestled along the docks in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. In warmer months, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) uses this ship to gather data on water quality, and has for over forty years. And each year since 1991, a group of lucky educators has squeezed on board and, for nine days, also called this ship home. 

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2024/02/teachers-and-scientists-work-together-on-the-lake-guardian/

Lisa John Rogers, Great Lakes Now

Consortium of Great Lakes universities and tech companies gets $15M to seek ways to clean wastewater

MADISON, Wis. (AP) — The National Science Foundation has given a consortium of Great Lakes-area universities and tech companies $15 million to develop ways to extract harmful substances from wastewater.

The foundation announced Monday that it has named the Great Lakes ReNEW group as one of 10 regional innovation engines across the country.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2024/01/ap-consortium-of-great-lakes-universities-and-tech-companies-gets-15m-to-seek-ways-to-clean-wastewater/

The Associated Press

Wisconsin agency’s expanded mission led to record $450 million investment in Milwaukee waterways

Since assuming the helm of Milwaukee’s sewerage agency (MMSD) in 2002, Kevin Shafer has been focused on managing and expanding the city’s deep tunnels designed to keep sewage out of Lake Michigan.

Knowing that tunnels alone are not enough, Shafer also started a campaign to emphasize green infrastructure and over the years, Milwaukee went from having a reputation as a bad actor to being a national leader in managing sewage overflows.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2023/11/wisconsin-agencys-expanded-mission-led-to-record-450-million-investment-in-milwaukee-waterways/

Gary Wilson

Federal, local officials agree on $450 million deal to clean up Milwaukee waterways

MILWAUKEE (AP) — Federal, state and local officials have agreed to spend about $450 million to dredge contaminated sediment from Milwaukee’s Lake Michigan harbor and area rivers.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced Thursday that it will devote $275 million from the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative to the project.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2023/10/ap-federal-local-officials-agree-on-450-million-deal-to-clean-up-milwaukee-waterways/

The Associated Press

Milwaukee suburb begins pulling millions of gallons per day from Lake Michigan

WAUKESHA, Wis. (AP) — A Milwaukee suburb has finally started to pull millions of gallons of water per day from Lake Michigan after spending years seeking approval from regulators.

The city of Waukesha began the diversion Monday. City officials say 90% of the city will be using Lake Michigan’s water within five days.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2023/10/ap-milwaukee-suburb-pulling-millions-gallons-lake-michigan/

The Associated Press

Milwaukee residents fear more flooding due to planned I-94 expansion

by Jonah Chester, Wisconsin Watch

This piece is part of a collaboration that includes the Institute for Nonprofit News, Borderless, Ensia, Planet Detroit, Sahan Journal, and Wisconsin Watch, as well as the Guardian and Inside Climate News. The project was supported by the Joyce Foundation. 

Janet Haas two decades ago saw potential in a field of thistle, grass and bushes that Milwaukee County had neglected: Valley Park, nestled between the Menomonee River to the west and homes in one of Milwaukee’s most racially diverse neighborhoods to the east.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2023/08/milwaukee-residents-fear-flooding-due-planned-i-94-expansion/

Wisconsin Watch

FRESH: New Wisconsin Law Aims to Protect Watersheds From Farm Runoff

May 16, 2023

Fresh is a biweekly newsletter from Circle of Blue that unpacks the biggest international, state, and local policy news stories facing the Great Lakes region today. Sign up for Fresh: A Great Lakes Policy Briefing, straight to your inbox, every other Tuesday.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2023/05/fresh-wisconsin-law-protect-watersheds-farm-runoff/

Circle of Blue

The R/V Neeskay will be the site of a workshop for teaching professionals this August. Submitted image.

Wisconsin Sea Grant is excited to announce its 2023 in-person Great Lakes literacy professional learning workshop for formal and nonformal educators in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Over the course of two days, August 16-17, educators will work alongside each other, engineers, scientists and Sea Grant educators to take a deep dive into coastal engineering. 

The workshop will explore how coastal engineering can shape and strengthen our coasts and shorelines, using Milwaukee and its Lake Michigan shoreline as a case study. It will include time aboard R/V Neeskay giving a unique perspective to the engineering transformations of the community. Educators will be introduced to activities and lessons to bring back engineering to their learners. The content is best suited to educators working at the middle and high school levels.

A full agenda will be provided shortly. Both experienced and educators new to Great Lakes literacy are encouraged to apply. Stipends will be provided to cover attendance and travel.

Fill out an application today! Deadline is June 15.

 

The post Waterfronts Past and Present: Learn How Engineers Design with Nature first appeared on Wisconsin Sea Grant.

Original Article

Blog | Wisconsin Sea Grant

Blog | Wisconsin Sea Grant

https://www.seagrant.wisc.edu/blog/waterfronts-past-and-present-learn-how-engineers-design-with-nature/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=waterfronts-past-and-present-learn-how-engineers-design-with-nature

Anne Moser

Mapping the Great Lakes: Flood risk

Love staring at a map and discovering something interesting? Then “Mapping the Great Lakes” is for you. It’s a monthly Great Lakes Now feature created by Alex B. Hill, a self-described “data nerd and anthropologist” who combines cartography, data, and analytics with storytelling and human experience.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2023/04/mapping-the-great-lakes-flood-risk/

Alex Hill

Smart sewers relieve stress on systems and wastewater officials, saving energy and funds

This is the second story in a series of reports from the Great Lakes News Collaborative that will investigate contemporary water pollution challenges in the Great Lakes region. Called Refresh, the series will explore the shortcomings in the Clean Water Act and how Michigan and other Great Lakes states can more completely address water pollution in the next 50 years.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2023/02/smart-sewers-systems-wastewater-officials-energy-funds/

Kari Lydersen

Great Lakes Moving Bridges: How they work and why we love them

They stop dozens of vehicles creating traffic jams so that a single boat can dawdle through and sometimes they make us late. They’re usually very old and expensive to maintain and operate and holy smokes, they move slow as cold molasses.

But seriously, aren’t they great?

“It can definitely be an inconvenience, but in all reality it’s only a few minutes every hour,” Port Clinton Mayor Mike Snider said.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2022/11/great-lakes-moving-bridges/

James Proffitt

The HOW Youth Panel. From left to right: Lindsey Bacigal, Dynasty Caesar, Joe Fitzgerald, Brenda Santoyo, and Brooke Bowers. Image credit: Deidre Peroff

Sea Grant’s Social Science Outreach Specialist, Deidre Peroff, recently attended an inspiring conference and offered these reflections.

After a two-year hiatus due to the pandemic, we were finally able to host the 2022 Healing Our Waters/Great Lakes Conference in Milwaukee. It did not disappoint! There are so many things I love and respect about this organization and about this conference. What inspires me most is that they really “get it” concerning issues of environmental and social justice, and the importance of bringing diverse voices to the table – particularly those from BIPOC communities who traditionally have been underrepresented in environmental work.

This was obvious from the conference panelists, presenters, and attendees. When I looked around the room, I was inspired to see black and brown faces. When I sat back to hear the presenters, it was motivating to see these faces centered and leading discussion on important topics that affect us all and speaking from podiums, rather than in the background.

In addition, while there is a laundry list of topics that could be presented at a conference focusing on environmental issues in the Great Lakes, this conference takes a deep dive into topics and provides a platform to uplift voices of those most affected by the topics that are often overlooked in other events.

Some key questions addressed include: How can we create a communications plan to activate communities in environmental change? How have community voices been elevated in fighting PFAS and impacts on residents? What does climate resilience mean to Indigenous populations and those impacted by toxic drinking water? What should be policy priorities to advance equity in ensuring safe drinking water through drinking water infrastructure and water affordability? And, what can we learn from youth in strategizing the future of the environmental movement?

While all of these questions were important and influential, I found myself diligently scribbling notes on the key points that were addressed in the youth panel. I wanted to introduce these amazing panelists and share some of their points here:

Brooke Bowers, a youth leader for We the People of Detroit, has the eloquence and knowledge of someone decades older than her 14 years. When reflecting on the importance of engaging youth in solving complex environmental problems she pointed out, “Who is going to carry on your work when all of you are gone? If we, as the next generation, aren’t taught this stuff and given a voice, wouldn’t all of your work have gone to waste?”

The three other panelists included Brenda Santoyo, a senior policy analyst at Little Village Environmental Justice Organization in Chicago; Dynasty Caesar, senior campaign organizer at the Redress Movement in Milwaukee; and Lindsey Bacigal, communications coordinator at Healing Our Waters – Great Lakes Coalition in Michigan.

Another overlapping theme was the importance of equity in the approach people use to engage community members in solving problems. Bowers pointed out that, despite good intentions, she’s seen people come into her community with their own agenda without bringing local priorities to the forefront. She stated, “Don’t downgrade problems we have in our own communities as being insignificant to your agenda and stop trying to help us out without giving us a voice in our own community.”

Caesar agreed that without community involvement from the beginning, people end up working on solving what they think should be prioritized rather than what is needed in the communities they are trying to serve.

She urged participants to stop the “buy-in” to projects. With the approach of communities “buying in” to projects their voices are not centered in the development, and objectives are developed outside of the communities they are trying to serve. She stated, “Don’t let your grant limit your scope and shadow work already being done. Instead, just be a good neighbor – you can’t be successful if you don’t talk to neighbors, otherwise it’s just your agenda.”

Similarly, there was a discussion on how to be more accommodating and equitable in encouraging underserved communities to be environmental stewards. Caesar shared stories of how people often try to support environmental initiatives or purchase “sustainable” products but sometimes this is just not possible because of financial barriers and lack of accessibility. While it’s easy to tell someone that they are doing the wrong thing (e.g., using plastic bottles), deeper issues are usually hiding regarding trust in having safe drinking water and inequitable pricing on products advertised as “eco.” She argued the importance and stated, “How can we make this space not so elitist and make corporations more accountable?”

Finally, how can we better equip young people to come into this space and lift their voices? Bacigal expressed the need to respect and value youth outside of just having them represented as a “check box” (tokenism) but instead, listening to them and asking your organization, “how are we supporting youth?”

Bowers mentioned social media as a way to engage youth and others pointed out specifically that, while for decades the environmental movement has been predominately white, we all need to be intentional in creating more spaces for BIPOC involvement.

Santoyo also included that “burnout is real” and the need to prioritize mental and physical health in the workplace so that we can all support each other to do this tiring work… perhaps something we all know too well.

To wrap up, Caesar acknowledged, “This isn’t a personal attack on any of you, but it’s the reality of the situation. If you felt moved, take the time to change it. We are all on this planet and we need to take care of it and stop shaming people.”

Thank you to Joe Fitzgerald of Milwaukee Water Commons for putting this panel together and for the four “rock star” women on the panel. If this is what our next generation looks like we are indeed in good hands.

The post Stop the “buy-in”: Perspectives on community engagement from BIPOC youth leaders at the annual Great Lakes/Healing Our Waters Conference first appeared on Wisconsin Sea Grant.

Original Article

Blog | Wisconsin Sea Grant

Blog | Wisconsin Sea Grant

https://www.seagrant.wisc.edu/blog/stop-the-buy-in-perspectives-on-community-engagement-from-bipoc-youth-leaders-at-the-annual-great-lakes-healing-our-waters-conference/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=stop-the-buy-in-perspectives-on-community-engagement-from-bipoc-youth-leaders-at-the-annual-great-lakes-healing-our-waters-conference

Deidre Peroff

Mapping the Great Lakes: Where do you live?

Love staring at a map and discovering something interesting? Then “Mapping the Great Lakes” is for you. It’s a monthly Great Lakes Now feature created by Alex B. Hill, a self-described “data nerd and anthropologist” who combines cartography, data, and analytics with storytelling and human experience.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2022/10/mapping-the-great-lakes-where-do-you-live/

Alex Hill

How to steer money for drinking water and sewer upgrades to the communities that need it most

By Andrian Lee, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and Melissa Scanlan, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, The Conversation

 is an independent and nonprofit source of news, analysis and commentary from academic experts.

When storms like Hurricane Ian strike, many people have to cope afterward with losing water service.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2022/10/money-drinking-water-sewer-upgrades-communities-need-most/

The Conversation

Great Lakes News Collaborative nets US Water Prize

In front of an international crowd of water researchers, policymakers, community organizers and other officials, the US Water Alliance announced the Great Lakes News Collaborative as the recipient of the 2022 award for “Outstanding One Water Communication.”

The awards presentation took place during the Alliance’s One Water Summit in Milwaukee.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2022/09/great-lakes-news-collaborative-nets-water-prize/

GLN Editor

A look back on Queen Elizabeth’s Great Lakes tour

Queen Elizabeth II left her mark in the Great Lakes region, from joining President Dwight D. Eisenhower at the opening of the St. Lawrence Seaway to sailing on Lake Michigan and Lake Huron.

Following the Thursday news of the longest-reigning British monarch’s passing, PBS stations across the nation broadcasted programs commemorating her life and local news organizations reported on the late queen’s special connection to the region, highlighting the 45-day tour of Canada and the Great Lakes she took in 1959.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2022/09/look-back-on-queen-elizabeths-great-lakes-tour/

GLN Editor

The Catch: Pollution problems … and solutions

Broadcasting in our monthly PBS television program, The Catch is a Great Lakes Now series that brings you more news about the lakes you love. Go beyond the headlines with reporters from around the region who cover the lakes and drinking water issues. Find all the work HERE.

In Milwaukee, officials are working to eliminate combined sewage overflows that can pour pollution into local waterways including Lake Michigan.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2022/07/the-catch-pollution-problems/

GLN Editor

Sustainable Shipping: At the Port of Milwaukee the wind blows toward a greener future

Shipping companies and ports around the world and on the Great Lakes are launching sustainability efforts to lessen their environmental impact, combat climate change, and improve their efficiency and images. With support from the Solutions Journalism Network, Great Lakes Now Contributor Kari Lydersen is reporting the four-part series “Sustainable Shipping.”

Read them here:

Are voluntary efforts enough to improve port sustainability?

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2021/11/sustainable-shipping-port-milwaukee-the-wind-green-energy/

Kari Lydersen

Sewer overflow sends wastewater into rivers, Lake Michigan

MILWAUKEE (AP) — Days of heavy rain this month overwhelmed Milwaukee’s sewer system, sending millions of gallons of untreated wastewater into area rivers and Lake Michigan.

The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reported that storms on Aug. 6 triggered the overflow and more rain on Aug. 7 and Aug. 8 prolonged the flow.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2021/08/ap-sewer-overflow-wastewater-lake-michigan/

The Associated Press

See the Sturgeon: The many ways to see, touch and appreciate sturgeon around the region

When the Milwaukee River Lake Sturgeon Reintroduction Project began 16 years ago, success wasn’t immediately apparent.

Having a solid scientific foundation for the project wasn’t the problem: sturgeon were raised in the Milwaukee River so they would return there to spawn when the time came. The problem was that lake sturgeon don’t return to a river to spawn for around 15 years.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2021/07/ways-see-touch-appreciate-sturgeon-great-lakes-region/

Noah Bock

Investing in the Lakes: New bill could redirect tech money to neglected Great Lakes cities

As President Joe Biden tries to advance his high-profile legislative agenda in a sharply divided Congress, a low-profile bill that could help the Great Lakes region is progressing with bipartisan support.

If passed, it could finally help the region shake its Rust Belt image.

The legislation is the U.S.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2021/07/legislation-investment-tech-research-great-lakes-cities/

Gary Wilson

Wisconsin Sea Grant has a new team member in the effort to protect our waters from aquatic invasive species. Scott McComb began May 3 as the southeast Wisconsin aquatic invasive species (AIS) outreach specialist.

Scott McComb has joined the staff of Wisconsin Sea Grant. (Submitted photo)

McComb’s position focuses on Kenosha, Racine and Milwaukee counties, where he will coordinate education, monitoring and outreach programs for communities, stakeholders and volunteers to prevent the spread of AIS. His office is located at the Kenosha County Center in Bristol, though he anticipates spending a significant amount of time in the field in the three counties.

The three main programs McComb will focus on are the “Clean Boats, Clean Waters” campaign, a purple loosestrife biocontrol program and a citizen lake monitoring program. When possible, he’ll also have a presence at local and regional events (like Racine’s Salmon-A-Rama in July) to help spread the word about AIS prevention and answer the public’s questions.

McComb is eager to engage with a wide range of people. “Honestly, I feel like everyone under the sun is my stakeholder!” he laughed. He will partner with lake or homeowners’ associations that monitor bodies of water, government entities like parks departments, volunteer groups, conservation corps and individuals with an interest in maintaining healthy ecosystems for future generations.

He’s also keen to work with people of different ages. “I’d really like to engage youth and the diversity of cultures and backgrounds in this region. There are so many great groups and people to connect to,” said McComb.

As the summer recreation season gets underway and people head out for boating, fishing and other outdoor pastimes, McComb stressed the basics of protecting our waters, such as the “Inspect—remove—drain—never move—dispose” motto. People should inspect their boats, kayaks or other watercraft for aquatic plants and animals; remove any that are found; drain water from live wells and other areas; never move water, plants or animals between waterbodies; and dispose of unused bait in the trash.

Additionally, he said, “Just be curious and keep your eyes open with what’s going on in the different lakes that you use. You don’t need to be an expert on aquatic vegetation to see a species start to take over, and there’s a whole bunch of people—including myself and DNR folks—who are here to help you identify something if you think it’s an invasive.”

McComb during a hike in Zebra Canyon, Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument, Utah. (Submitted photo)

McComb grew up in the Madison area and earned a bachelor’s degree in geography from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. He then spent several years in Utah, where he completed a master’s degree in bioregional planning and worked in planning and conservation.

Said Tim Campbell, Wisconsin Sea Grant’s aquatic invasive species outreach specialist, “Scott has a lot of experience helping communities plan and implement projects that help them improve their communities. I look forward to seeing how that experience helps him build upon existing local partnerships in southeast Wisconsin to improve aquatic invasive species prevention and management.”

A desire to be closer to family brought McComb and his wife back to Wisconsin. In their free time, they enjoy canoeing, kayaking and simply being out in nature.

As McComb settles into his new role, he encourages people seeking AIS information to get in touch. He can be reached at 608-890-0977 or McComb@aqua.wisc.edu.

The post Scott McComb ready to take on aquatic invasive species role in southeast Wisconsin first appeared on Wisconsin Sea Grant.

Original Article

News Releases – Wisconsin Sea Grant

News Releases – Wisconsin Sea Grant

https://www.seagrant.wisc.edu/news/scott-mccomb-ready-to-take-on-aquatic-invasive-species-role-in-southeast-wisconsin/

Jennifer Smith

Great Lakes Gift Guide 2020: Remember that road trip, boat ride, microbrew or sweatshirt you should’ve bought with this list

Want to give your loved ones a holiday gift that connects to that summer trip up north or the fall color tour you took together? 

Or maybe you have a trip planned for after the COVID-19 vaccines have been distributed and want to give them something to remind them they have something to look forward to. 

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2020/12/great-lakes-gift-guide-2020-list/

Natasha Blakely

Who in the U.S. Is in ‘Plumbing Poverty’? Mostly Urban Residents, Study Says

By Brett Walton, Circle of Blue

The Great Lakes News Collaborative includes Bridge Michigan; Circle of Blue; Great Lakes Now at Detroit Public Television; and Michigan Radio, Michigan’s NPR News Leader; who work together to bring audiences news and information about the impact of climate change, pollution, and aging infrastructure on the Great Lakes and drinking water.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2020/11/plumbing-poverty-urban-residents-study/

Circle of Blue

On Wisconsin: Great Lakes Now television series begins airing on PBS Wisconsin

Television audiences in Wisconsin can now tune in to the award-winning Great Lakes Now program on six more PBS stations.

Beginning Oct. 1, PBS Wisconsin will carry the series on The Wisconsin Channel broadcast on six signals: WHA-TV in Madison, WHLA-TV in La Crosse, WPNE-TV in Green Bay, WHRM-TV in Wausau, WHWC-TV in Menomonie-Eau Claire and WLEF-TV in Park Falls.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2020/10/great-lakes-now-airing-pbs-wisconsin/

GLN Editor

Message to 2020 Candidates: Focus on water quality in Great Lakes states

Detroit water rights advocate Monica Lewis-Patrick has a few questions for presidential candidates incumbent Donald Trump and former Vice President Joe Biden.

“What’s your water policy? What will you do to protect our drinking water,” Lewis-Patrick asked in a July Healing Our Waters Coalition press release that asked the candidates to support a Great Lakes water platform.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2020/09/2020-candidates-water-quality-great-lakes-states/

Gary Wilson

Milwaukee significantly behind in project to replace 1,100 lead pipes by end of year

By Matt Martinez, Milwaukee Neighborhood News Services, through the Institute for Nonprofit News network

The city is significantly behind in its goal to replace 1,100 lead pipes by the end of the year, exacerbated in part by the ongoing pandemic, Milwaukee officials say.

As of Aug.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2020/08/milwaukee-significantly-behind-lead-pipes-by-end-of-year/

Milwaukee Neighborhood News Service

PFAS News Roundup: Research suggests link with COVID-19, disposal methods increase contamination

PFAS, short for per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances, are a group of widespread man-made chemicals that don’t break down in the environment or the human body and have been flagged as a major contaminant in sources of water across the country.

Keep up with PFAS-related developments in the Great Lakes area.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2020/07/pfas-michigan-wisconsin-legislation-foam-covid-19/

Samantha Cantie

Drinking Water News Roundup: Well contamination, Montreal distributing lead filters, water protection project grants awarded

From lead pipes to PFAS, drinking water contamination is a major issue plaguing cities and towns all around the Great Lakes. Cleaning up contaminants and providing safe water to everyone is an ongoing public health struggle in the region.

Keep up with drinking water-related developments in the Great Lakes area.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2020/06/drinking-water-news-roundup-contamination-runoff-grants-lead/

Emily Simroth

New program targets youths and educators in Milwaukee to develop Great Lakes literacy skills

May 27, 2020

By Marie Zhuikov

A report released last year showed that Wisconsin has the largest academic achievement gap between African-American and white students in the nation. The National Assessment of Education Progress tested fourth- and eighth-graders in 2019. African-American students in Wisconsin posted the lowest reading and math scores, as well as in science.

A new two-year Water Resources Institute project will work to help close this gap. Set in Milwaukee, home to the largest number of African-American students in the state, the project is a collaboration among the University of Wisconsin Madison Division of Extension Natural Resources Institute staff and three partner schools. Approximately 100 students, ages 10 to 15, and at least two educators will take part in the project.

Image credit: Justin Hougham

Extension staff will train teachers in ways to foster student inquiry and science observations skills. They will also travel to the schools — Escuela Verde, La Escuela Fratney and Maryland Avenue Montessori — to facilitate sessions with students to develop water-related research projects.

Justin Hougham, project principal investigator, is director of the university’s Upham Woods Outdoor Learning Center and an associate professor at UW-Madison. Hougham said, in addition to meeting needs identified by the National Assessment survey, the project’s framework comes from a biannual survey Extension conducts on the status and needs of environmental education groups in Wisconsin.

“The No. 1 skill that people wanted was for their organizations to be better at diversity, equity and inclusivity work in environmental education. The No. 1 content area (which is different than a skill), was support for STEM work. They also wanted increased information and opportunity for professional development around using technology in environmental education,” Hougham said.

Students will receive hands-on experience using science technology in the field in their local communities. This includes equipment such as thermal imagers, digital microscopes and water testing tools. They will also learn how to apply the scientific method to their projects.

Hougham explained how he and his team of Isabelle Herde and Zoe Goodrow with UW-Madison will take the project one step further. “We realized the more important or impactful thing we can do is not just have people be better at looking at data, but to be more skilled at telling stories with that information. More specifically, telling stories about environmental issues in their community that are important to them. We want to look at environmental issues through the lens of our youth and educators.”

Image credit: Justin Hougham.

The students can share their stories via social media, science fairs and community events.

Because the rivers flowing through Milwaukee are part of the Great Lakes watershed, the project will connect students to the Great Lakes through their research projects, and so will improve their Great Lakes literacy.

“We’re excited to be doing this work,” Hougham said. “It’s connected to a lot of previous projects that we have had in the Milwaukee area, which will allow it to be successful. It’s important to take the long view on environmental issues, but also with community engagement in them.”

The team hopes these connections will help build a generation invested in the health of one of the largest sources of fresh water in the world – and close academic gaps.

Original Article

News Release – WRI

News Release – WRI

https://www.wri.wisc.edu/news/telling-stories-about-science/

mzhuikov

Sewage Check: Great Lakes researchers look to wastewater for data on COVID-19

The virus can be detected in infected people’s feces – sometimes even before they begin exhibiting symptoms.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2020/05/sewage-check-researchers-look-to-wastewater-for-data-on-covid-19/

Sharon Oosthoek

COVID-19 Next Steps: Great Lakes outdoor recreation begins move toward normalcy

After nearly two months of reduced access, various levels of restrictions and outright closures, thousands of national, state, provincial and municipal parks, boating ramps, wildlife areas and other outdoor recreation areas are making their return from COVID-19.

Officials are hoping the move will help push life closer to normal for millions of people.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2020/05/coronavirus-covid-19-great-lakes-outdoor-recreation-reopening/

James Proffitt

Milwaukee Neighborhood Pushes Toward Climate Resilience

Over the last two decades, Milwaukee's Walnut Way neighborhood has gradually transformed from lifeless parcels to green space and become a model for others.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2020/05/rust-resilience-milwaukee-climate-resilience-green/

WUWM-FM, Milwaukee Public Broadcasting

Earth Day 2020: How to participate from the safety of your home

This year’s Earth Day is a special one, and not just because it’s the 50th anniversary of the event.

With stay home orders and heavy social distancing recommendations in light of the COVID-19 pandemic, the usual large gatherings of people to show support, clear trash and do more to help the planet just aren’t plausible.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2020/04/earth-day-2020-participate-from-home/

Natasha Blakely

From Rust to Resilience: Climate change brings new challenges and opportunities

Great Lakes Now is sharing work from our partners in a project on what climate change means for Great Lakes cities. Here is the initial piece in the series.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2020/04/rust-resilience-climate-change-great-lakes-cities/

Ensia

Water for All: Milwaukee, Chicago lead in ensuring water during COVID-19 crisis

Some Great Lakes cities and states are ahead of the game when it comes to ending water shutoffs during the COVID-19 crisis. Others aren’t.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2020/03/water-shutoffs-milwaukee-chicago-detroit-cleveland-buffalo-duluth/

Gary Wilson

Inside Entertainment: COVID-19 has Great Lakes aquariums and museums offering online activities

The public can continue to enjoy aquariums, museums and centers as the facilities close buildings. But starting March 25, Parks Canada is closing all national parks.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2020/03/aquariums-museums-online-livestreams-covid-19/

Kathy Johnson

Who’s in charge: Lack of storage facility oversight puts waterways at risk

In major lakeside cities around the Great Lakes, there isn’t a clear answer on who handles oversight of industrial storage facilities.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2020/03/seawall-inspections-industrial-storage-pollution-government/

Gary Wilson