Ghostly Grey Specters

An eerie sight is blossoming throughout coastal wetlands in Georgian Bay: ghostly grey specters lining the shores behind otherwise healthy-looking wetlands.

“Do you see these dead trees?” asked Patricia Chow-Fraser. The McMaster University biologist was addressing attendees of a lecture at The Water Institute at the University of Waterloo in early March.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2024/04/ghostly-grey-specters/

Andrew Reeves

PFAS News Roundup: Landmark EPA decision implements first nation-wide PFAS limit in drinking water

In Fayetteville, North Carolina on Wednesday, April 10, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced the nation’s first ever drinking water standards for PFAS. Limits will be capped at the lowest possible limit, about 4 parts per trillion. The Biden-Harris Administration concurrently announced a $1 billion investment to update water treatment plants around the country.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2024/04/pfas-news-roundup-landmark-epa-decision-implements-first-nation-wide-pfas-limit-in-drinking-water/

Lisa John Rogers, Great Lakes Now

In Chicago, one neighborhood is fighting gentrification and climate change at the same time

By Juanpablo Ramirez-Franco, Grist

This story was originally published by Grist. Sign up for Grist’s weekly newsletter here.

This coverage is made possible through a partnership between WBEZ and Grist, a nonprofit environmental media organization.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2024/04/in-chicago-one-neighborhood-is-fighting-gentrification-and-climate-change-at-the-same-time/

Grist

Bald eagle return exceeds expectations

In 1979, there were just four nesting pairs of bald eagles in the entire state of Ohio. Today there are more than 900 pairs spread throughout all but three of Ohio’s 88 counties, not including the immature birds that still appear mottled with brown and white because haven’t yet developed white plumage on their heads.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2024/04/bald-eagle-return-exceeds-expectations/

James Proffitt, Great Lakes Now

After a hot winter, Whitmer asks for more ways to get aid to businesses

By Izzy Ross, Interlochen Public Radio

This coverage is made possible through a partnership with IPR and Grist, a nonprofit independent media organization dedicated to telling stories of climate solutions and a just future.

A grassy, mud-streaked ski hill.

Snowmobile trails where dirt and fall leaves were still visible.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2024/04/after-a-hot-winter-whitmer-asks-for-more-ways-to-get-aid-to-businesses/

Interlochen Public Radio

During the 2024 eclipse, biologists like us want to find out how birds will respond to darkness in the middle of the day

By Kimberly Rosvall, Indiana University and Liz Aguilar, Indiana University 

 is an independent and nonprofit source of news, analysis and commentary from academic experts.

The total solar eclipse on April 8, 2024, coincides with an exciting time for wild birds. Local birds are singing for mates and fighting for territories as they gear up for their once-a-year chance to breed.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2024/04/during-the-2024-eclipse-biologists-like-us-want-to-find-out-how-birds-will-respond-to-darkness-in-the-middle-of-the-day/

The Conversation

EPA head Regan defends $20B green bank: ‘I feel really good about this program’

By Matthew Daly, Associated Press

PHILADELPHIA (AP) — The head of the Environmental Protection Agency on Friday defended a new $20 billion federal “green bank” program, saying it will finance a variety of projects to create low-carbon solutions to combat climate change, including in disadvantaged communities that are most affected by pollution.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2024/04/epa-head-regan-defends-20b-green-bank-i-feel-really-good-about-this-program/

The Associated Press

Energy News Roundup: Even the solar eclipse is an energy issue

In Ohio and other states in the path of Monday’s total solar eclipse, tons of harried officials are busy dealing with concerns like traffic congestion and hotel capacity. At least a few are also conscious of the fact that demand for electricity is going to spike at the same time that the supply of solar power temporarily plummets.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2024/04/energy-news-roundup-even-the-solar-eclipse-is-an-energy-issue/

Nicole Pollack, Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Moment: Saving the Conservation Crescent

Great Lakes Moment is a monthly column written by Great Lakes Now Contributor John Hartig. Publishing the author’s views and assertions does not represent endorsement by Great Lakes Now or Detroit Public Television.

Twenty-five years ago, several lower Detroit River islands and marshes were threatened by development.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2024/04/great-lakes-moment-saving-the-conservation-crescent/

John Hartig

Points North: Not always the apex predator

By Daniel Wanschura, Interlochen Public Radio

Points North is a biweekly podcast about the land, water and inhabitants of the Great Lakes. This episode was shared here with permission from Interlochen Public Radio.

On November 11, 2023, Ben Karasch is up in his treestand, waiting for a deer.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2024/04/points-north-not-always-the-apex-predator/

Interlochen Public Radio

Through a Glass Darkly

Increasingly, scientists and regulators are concerned about the presence of pharmaceutical pollution in our waterways, including in the Great Lakes region. This contamination has the potential to harm wildlife and make antibiotics less effective. However, more research needs to be done to understand this issue, according to scientists who have studied pharmaceuticals and other contaminants.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2024/03/through-a-glass-darkly/

Sean Ericson, Great Lakes Now

Nibi Chronicles: The nation-to-nation fight against extractivism

Ricky DeFoe can tell you all you need to know about fresh water on Earth in one minute or less. He rattles off that “70% of our planet — our Mother Earth is water. Ninety-seven percent of that water is saltwater. That leaves just 3% freshwater — 1% is in the atmosphere, 1% is subsurface, and 1% is on the surface.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2024/03/nibi-chronicles-the-nation-to-nation-fight-against-extractivism/

Staci Lola Drouillard

PFAS News Roundup: MIT chemists designed a sensor that detects PFAS

Keep up with PFAS-related developments in the Great Lakes area with Great Lakes Now’s biweekly headline roundup.

Click on the headline to read the full story:

 

Indiana

A bill to secure industry use of toxic PFAS is dead – for now.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2024/03/pfas-news-roundup-mit-chemists-designed-a-sensor-that-detects-pfas/

Kathy Johnson, Great Lakes Now

Ontario weakens watershed protections (again) as natural resources minister gets new powers

By Fatima Syed, The Narwhal

The Great Lakes News Collaborative includes Bridge Michigan; Circle of Blue; Great Lakes Now at Detroit Public Television; Michigan Public, Michigan’s NPR News Leader; and The Narwhal who work together to bring audiences news and information about the impact of climate change, pollution, and aging infrastructure on the Great Lakes and drinking water.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2024/03/ontario-weakens-watershed-protections-again-as-natural-resources-minister-gets-new-powers/

The Narwhal

Waves of Change: Meet bird conservationist and migration counter Alison Vilag

Waves of Change is an online interview series highlighting the diverse faces and perspectives shaping the environmental justice movement throughout the Great Lakes region.

This month, we spoke with Alison Vilag, a bird conservationist and migration counter based in northern Michigan.

Listen to the full interview

She’s traveled all over the country and has helped document a loss of birds that scientists call staggering.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2024/03/waves-of-change-meet-bird-conservationist-and-migration-counter-alison-vilag/

Great Lakes Now

Illinois and Army Corps at an impasse over building barrier to prevent invasive carp

By Juanpablo Ramirez-Franco, WBEZ

This coverage is made possible through a partnership between WBEZ and Grist, a nonprofit, independent media organization dedicated to telling stories of climate solutions and a just future. Sign up for WBEZ newsletters to get local news you can trust.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2024/03/illinois-and-army-corps-at-an-impasse-over-building-barrier-to-prevent-invasive-carp/

WBEZ

From the Ice Age to Now: A Lake Erie timeline

Lake Erie covers about 9,900 square miles and stretches 240 miles from southwest to northeast with an average depth of 62 feet. It borders four states and the province of Ontario. About 12 million people live in the watershed, including 17 major metropolitan areas. More than 10 million people rely on the lake as a source of drinking water.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2024/03/from-the-ice-age-to-now-a-lake-erie-timeline/

James Proffitt, Great Lakes Now

The solar eclipse is a great opportunity for students and citizen scientists alike

On April 8, a solar eclipse will march from Maine to Mexico, darkening the skies during midday. The moon’s shadow will black out the sun completely just south of Michigan, but folks in the southeast part of the state will be close to the action and also experience almost complete darkness.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2024/03/the-solar-eclipse-is-a-great-opportunity-for-students-and-citizen-scientists-alike/

Sarah Derouin, Great Lakes Now

Composting, water access and backyard chickens: Detroit’s urban farming evolution

This article was republished here with permission from Planet Detroit.

By Nina Ignaczak, Planet Detroit

Detroit’s urban agriculture movement traces back to Hazen Pingree’s 1890s potato patch plan,World War II victory gardens, and Mayor Coleman Young’s Farm-A-Lot program in the 1970s.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2024/03/detroits-urban-farming-evolution/

Planet Detroit

International nuclear energy expert questions Michigan’s Palisades restart

Is investing a combined $1.8 billion in federal and state funds to restart the aged Palisades nuclear power plant on the Lake Michigan shore necessary to meet Michigan’s climate goals?

That’s what’s in the works, with the Department of Energy leading with a $1.5 billion dollar loan guarantee and Michigan budgeting $300 million to support the restart.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2024/03/international-nuclear-energy-expert-questions-michigans-palisades-restart/

Gary Wilson, Great Lakes Now

Where to see rare solar eclipse in Ohio

The path of totality during the April 8 solar eclipse is expected to run directly across northwest Ohio, keeping tourism officials in the area, who normally plan for crowds to begin arriving in May, extra busy.   

Some private campgrounds in the area that are opening early for the eclipse and have sites available, including Crystal Rock, Erie and Ottawa County fairgrounds, Cedarlane RV Resort, Camp Sandusky and Camp Perry RV Park.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2024/03/where-to-see-rare-solar-eclipse-in-ohio/

James Proffitt

I Speak for the Fish: When a bass is not a bass

I Speak for the Fish is a monthly column written by Great Lakes Now Contributor Kathy Johnson, coming out the third Monday of each month. Publishing the author’s views and assertions does not represent endorsement by Great Lakes Now or Detroit Public Television. 

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2024/03/i-speak-for-the-fish-when-a-bass-is-not-a-bass/

Kathy Johnson, Great Lakes Now

Video: It’s Detroiters vs dust in west side neighborhood

By Jena Brooker, BridgeDetroit

BridgeDetroit reporter Jena Brooker collaborated with One Detroit (Detroit Public TV) on this segment on concrete crushing in a Detroit neighborhood. Read more of her coverage and subscribe to her newsletter.

One Detroit’s senior producer Bill Kubota teamed up with filmmaker and One Detroit contributor Nicole Macdonald to talk with residents about their concerns over heavy industry operating in city neighborhoods.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2024/03/video-its-detroiters-vs-dust-in-west-side-neighborhood/

BridgeDetroit

Points North: Olympic Dream Takes a U.P. Village

By Morgan Springer, Interlochen Public Radio

Points North is a biweekly podcast about the land, water and inhabitants of the Great Lakes. This episode was shared here with permission from Interlochen Public Radio.

Nick Baumgartner went to the 2022 Winter Olympics ready to win.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2024/03/points-north-olympic-dream-takes-a-u-p-village/

Interlochen Public Radio

Efforts to thwart regulation of PFAS polluters move down parallel tracks

This article, first posted here, was republished with permission from Wisconsin Watch.

By Bennet Goldstein, Wisconsin Watch

Last week, a divided Wisconsin Court of Appeals upheld a lower court ruling that limited the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources’ ability to regulate PFAS and other emerging contaminants under the state’s long-standing spills law.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2024/03/efforts-to-thwart-regulation-of-pfas-polluters-move-down-parallel-tracks/

Wisconsin Watch

The Northwoods is now a month into unusually early maple tapping season

By Katie Thoresen, WXPR

This story was originally published by WXPR. WXPR is a community-licensed public radio station serving north central Wisconsin and adjacent areas of Michigan’s Upper Peninsula. Listen to their stories here.

Bright blue tubes web between the trees that run to the little red pump house that sits in the woods on the edge of 10 acres full of maple trees at Whataview Farm in Phelps.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2024/03/the-northwoods-is-now-a-month-into-unusually-early-maple-tapping-season/

WXPR

Lake Superior is warming fast. Its national parks are starting work to cut fossil fuels

By Izzy Ross, Interlochen Public Radio

This coverage is made possible through a partnership with IPR and Grist, a nonprofit independent media organization dedicated to telling stories of climate solutions and a just future.

As national parks around the country try to raise awareness about climate change, those around Lake Superior are taking steps to cut their emissions.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2024/03/lake-superior-is-warming-fast-its-national-parks-are-starting-work-to-cut-fossil-fuels/

Interlochen Public Radio

Pennsylvania farmers convicted of poisoning over two dozen migratory birds

This article was republished here with permission from Great Lakes Echo.

By Anna Barnes, Great Lakes Echo

Two Pennsylvania farmers have been found guilty of poisoning over two dozen migratory birds with a restricted substance.

Robert Yost and Jacob Reese, located in Econ Valley, Pennsylvania, were found guilty in January of three charges related to poisoning 17 Canada geese, 10 red-winged blackbirds and one mallard duck, according to the U.S.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2024/03/pennsylvania-farmers-convicted-of-poisoning-over-two-dozen-migratory-birds/

Great Lakes Echo

Fewer fish and more algae? Scientists seek to understand impacts of historic lack of Great Lakes ice

By Todd Richmond, Associated Press

RACINE, Wis. (AP) — Michigan Tech University biologists have been observing a remote Lake Superior island’s fragile wolf population every winter since 1958, but they had to cut this season’s planned seven-week survey short after just two weeks.

The ski plane they study the wolves from uses the frozen lake as a landing strip because there’s nowhere to touch down on the island.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2024/03/ap-fewer-fish-and-more-algae-scientists-seek-to-understand-impacts-of-historic-lack-of-great-lakes-ice/

The Associated Press

Tribes urge U.S. to weigh in on Line 5 case as appeal sits in court

By Izzy Ross, Interlochen Public Radio

This coverage is made possible through a partnership with IPR and Grist, a nonprofit independent media organization dedicated to telling stories of climate solutions and a just future.

Twelve miles of the Line 5 pipeline cross the lands of the Bad River Band of Lake Superior Chippewa in northern Wisconsin.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2024/03/tribes-urge-u-s-to-weigh-in-on-line-5-case-as-appeal-sits-in-court/

Interlochen Public Radio

Is the USDA’s spending on ‘climate-smart’ farming actually helping the climate?

By Max Graham, Grist

This story was originally published by Grist. You can subscribe to its weekly newsletter here.

America’s farms don’t just run on corn and cattle. They also run on cash from the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Every year, the USDA spends billions of dollars to keep farmers in business.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2024/03/is-the-usdas-spending-on-climate-smart-farming-actually-helping-the-climate/

Grist

Energy News Roundup: Chicago organization to build geothermal heating and cooling in south side alleys

Keep up with energy-related developments in the Great Lakes area with Great Lakes Now’s biweekly headline roundup.   

 

Click on the headline to read the full story:   

 

Illinois 

Chicago launches climate lawsuit against oil industry — E&E News by Politico 

 Chicago files a lawsuit accusing six oil companies and a major industry group of waging a campaign to discredit climate science and misleading the public about the dangers of fossil fuels. 

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2024/03/energy-news-roundup-chicago-organization-to-build-geothermal-heating-and-cooling-in-south-side-alleys/

Kathy Johnson, Great Lakes Now

Three Great Lakes commissions announce partnership to advance restoration

The Great Lakes Commission, Great Lakes Fishery Commission, and International Joint Commission are all tasked with varying aspects of management in the Great Lakes. On Wednesday, they all gathered ahead of a Washington, D.C. event honoring the region to sign a groundbreaking formal agreement. Going forward, the three organizations will work together to protect local ecosystems and the economies that depend on them.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2024/03/great-lakes-commissions-announce-partnership-to-advance-restoration/

Nicole Pollack, Great Lakes Now

Where will you be for the April 8 total solar eclipse? There’s still time to grab a spot

NEW YORK (AP) — Where will you be watching the April 8 total solar eclipse? There are just a few weeks left to pick your spot to see the skies darken along a strip of North America, whether by land, sea or air.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2024/03/ap-where-will-you-be-for-the-april-8-total-solar-eclipse-theres-still-time-to-grab-a-spot/

The Associated Press

Great Lakes Moment: Gordie Howe International Bridge becomes part of binational trail system

Imagine if the world’s longest trail (located in Canada) connected people even further, into another country, via Michigan’s longest trail. That happened last month when the Windsor Detroit Bridge Authority announced that the Gordie Howe International Bridge would become part of a binational trail system. 

When the initial discussions for a potential new bridge connecting Windsor and Detroit started about a decade ago, residents of Windsor and Detroit, and a coalition of organizations, came together to envision cross-border linkages.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2024/03/great-lakes-moment-gordie-howe-international-bridge-becomes-part-of-binational-trail-system/

John Hartig

Ottawa National Forest creates shaded fuel brakes to help protect communities from wildfires

Driving through the Ottawa National Forest north of Land O’Lakes towards Dinner Lake you’ll see snow-covered piles stacked up every few feet in the woods along the road.

Many of the piles are wood debris and branches left over from logging operations on the Ottawa.

Some of the piles have been waiting there for two years as the Forest Service let them dry out.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2024/03/ottawa-national-forest-creates-shaded-fuel-brakes-to-help-protect-communities-from-wildfires/

WXPR

Indiana conservation groups defend state’s wetlands that lost protection

This article was republished here with permission from Great Lakes Echo.

By Kayla Nelsen, Great Lakes Echo

About 250 acres of Indiana wetlands have been lost in the two years since wetland protections were eased, according to the Hoosier Environmental Council.

Since the 2021 law passed, mitigation requirements have decreased.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2024/02/indiana-conservation-groups-defend-states-wetlands-that-lost-protection/

Great Lakes Echo

“Bad River” documentary combines historical treatment of indigenous people with the fight to protect Lake Superior 

For documentary filmmaker Mary Mazzio, the trek from her first film to making her new release, “Bad River,” took 20 years and included a near-epiphany when the Bostonian first viewed a Lake Superior sunrise. Mazzio, an Olympic rower and attorney, has directed 12 significant films, including the Gracie Award winning “A Most Beautiful Thing.”  

“Bad River” will run from March 15-21 in select AMC theaters.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2024/02/bad-river-documentary-combines-historical-treatment-of-indigenous-people-with-the-fight-to-protect-lake-superior/

Gary Wilson, Great Lakes Now

Not Just Pretty Pictures: Bearing witness to the night sky

Editor’s Note: “Nibi Chronicles,” a monthly Great Lakes Now feature, is written by Staci Lola Drouillard. A direct descendant of the Grand Portage Band of Ojibwe, she lives and works in Grand Marais on Minnesota’s North Shore of Lake Superior. Her two books “Walking the Old Road: A People’s History of Chippewa City and the Grand Marais Anishinaabe” and “Seven Aunts” were published 2019 and 2022, and she is at work on a children’s story.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2024/02/not-just-pretty-pictures-bearing-witness-to-the-night-sky/

Staci Lola Drouillard

Lac du Flambeau Ojibwe Winter Games go on despite little snow on the ground

This story was originally published by WXPR. WXPR is a community-licensed public radio station serving north central Wisconsin and adjacent areas of Michigan’s Upper Peninsula. Listen to their stories here.

Lac du Flambeau 6th Grader Gertie Moustache pulls a wooden, dulled spear from a bin.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2024/02/lac-du-flambeau-ojibwe-winter-games-go-on-despite-little-snow-on-ground/

WXPR

Waves of Change: Meet Milwaukee Water Commons Co-Executive Director Brenda Coley

Waves of Change is an online interview series highlighting the diverse faces and perspectives shaping the environmental justice movement throughout the Great Lakes region.

This month, we spoke with Brenda Coley, Co-Executive Director of the urban network and non-profit organization Milwaukee Water Commons.

Listen to the full interview

The group has a Water City agenda that takes an intersectional approach to laying out climate issues and proposed solutions for Wisconsin’s largest city.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2024/02/waves-of-change-meet-milwaukee-water-commons-co-executive-director-brenda-coley/

Great Lakes Now

Wisconsin’s state fish tops the food chain

The long, fast, toothy muskellunge (also known as muskie or musky) is nicknamed the “Fish of 10,000 Casts” due to its notoriously elusive nature. It is the apex predator in all waters where it’s found, known to hide in underwater cover, aggressively ambushing prey. They eat fish almost exclusively, though they have been known to consume just about anything they can swallow including birds, small mammals, and their own kind.   

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2024/02/wisconsins-state-fish-tops-the-food-chain/

James Proffitt

As some push for repeal, state seeks input on renewable energy siting law

By Izzy Ross, Interlochen Public Radio

This coverage is made possible through a partnership with IPR and Grist, a nonprofit independent media organization dedicated to telling stories of climate solutions and a just future.

The Michigan Public Service Commission is gathering public input on a controversial new law, Public Act 233, which gives it final authority in approving large renewable energy projects.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2024/02/as-some-push-for-repeal-state-seeks-input-on-renewable-energy-siting-law/

Interlochen Public Radio

I Speak for the Fish: Bringing muskie to the masses

I Speak for the Fish is a monthly column written by Great Lakes Now Contributor Kathy Johnson, coming out the third Monday of each month. Publishing the author’s views and assertions does not represent endorsement by Great Lakes Now or Detroit Public Television. 

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2024/02/i-speak-for-the-fish-bringing-muskie-to-the-masses/

Kathy Johnson, Great Lakes Now

Teachers and scientists work together on the Lake Guardian 

The Lake Guardian is currently in its winter home, nestled along the docks in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. In warmer months, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) uses this ship to gather data on water quality, and has for over forty years. And each year since 1991, a group of lucky educators has squeezed on board and, for nine days, also called this ship home. 

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2024/02/teachers-and-scientists-work-together-on-the-lake-guardian/

Lisa John Rogers, Great Lakes Now

Want a healthy walleye fishery? Stock some muskie

As apex predators, adult muskie occupy the very top tier of the Great Lakes food chain. Reaching up to six foot in length with teeth lining their jaws, the roof of their mouths and their throats, few can escape them. They are feared by most species underwater and revered by many people above.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2024/02/want-healthy-walleye-fishery-stock-some-muskie/

Kathy Johnson, Great Lakes Now

What a permitting debacle in Fremont could mean for biodigesters across Michigan

By Izzy Ross, Interlochen Public Radio

This coverage is made possible through a partnership with IPR and Grist, a nonprofit independent media organization dedicated to telling stories of climate solutions and a just future.

• Michigan’s largest commercial food waste digester is shutting down after a permit dispute with the state.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2024/02/what-a-permitting-debacle-in-fremont-could-mean-for-biodigesters-across-michigan/

Interlochen Public Radio

How safe are Great Lakes fish to eat? Depends on who you ask

Catching and eating fish is a way of life for many people around the Great Lakes and connecting St. Lawrence River, but decades of industrial pollution have made it unsafe to eat too many, too often. The advice about how many and how often can vary wildly depending on which jurisdiction, even though the fish don’t care about the lines humans draw on a map.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2024/02/how-safe-great-lakes-fish-to-eat-depends-on-who-you-ask/

Brian Owens, Great Lakes Now

Enbridge appeals to vacate an order that would shut down its pipeline

By Todd Richmond, Associated Press

MADISON, Wis. (AP) — An attorney for the energy company Enbridge tried to persuade a federal appellate court Thursday to vacate an order that would shut down part of a pipeline running through a Wisconsin tribal reservation.

About 12 miles (19 km) of Enbridge’s Line 5 pipeline runs across the Bad River Band of Lake Superior Chippewa’s reservation.

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Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2024/02/ap-enbridge-appeals-to-vacate-an-order-that-would-shut-down-pipeline/

The Associated Press

The future of water management, with Curt Wolf

In order to do meaningful things at scale, everyone has to be at the table. This is what Curt Wolf, Managing Director of the University of Michigan’s Urban Collaboratory, said about the Michigan Center for Freshwater Innovation in an interview with Great Lakes Now. Last month, he explained the benefits of pulling together stakeholders, the Great Lakes Water Authority, and major universities like the University of Michigan, Wayne State, and Michigan State to all work alongside each other to collaborate on grand challenges, like catastrophic flooding in the region.  

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2024/02/the-future-of-water-management-with-curt-wolf/

Lisa John Rogers