Sticky

Over 30 years ago I helped the Nature Conservancy of Wis with their acquisition of most of Point au Sable.

Then by pure luck and over one year of work, I put together the transaction for the Northeastern Wis Land Trust for their acquisition of the “Twin Silos” 11 acres + property along Nicolet Drive which gave the Land Trust access to an additional 60+ acres that they also purchased.

This took over a year of work and is one of my most favorite transactions I ever did in my 35 years in real estate. I live very close to this area and can even see Point au Sauble from my windows of our bay cottage.

There is more to this as hopefully more property will be added to make this the finest future nature park in NE Wisconsin!

A red-headed woodpecker pauses from foraging on a tree. Photo by Debbie Koenigs/USFWS.

Read the full article: https://fws.gov/midwest/news/wequiockcreek.html?fbclid=IwAR1R80l5-tWFkCw3P9sQWUThKuuEIeqNsheGhhc_zkmdRcXotLMJJKxfs70

Minnesota Supreme Court hands victory to PolyMet copper mine

MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — The Minnesota Supreme Court on Wednesday reversed an appeals court’s rejection of a critical air emissions permit for the planned PolyMet copper-nickel mine and sent the case back for further proceedings.

The Supreme Court ruled that the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency was not required under federal law to investigate allegations by environmental groups and a Native American tribe of “sham permitting.”

PolyMet and the state agency took the case to the state’s highest court after the Minnesota Court of Appeals last March sent the air permit for the $1 billion mine back to the regulators for further review.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2021/02/ap-minnesota-supreme-court-victory-polymet-copper-mine/

The Associated Press

Michigan dams need ‘immediate attention’ to prevent next failure

By Kelly House, Bridge Michigan

The Great Lakes News Collaborative includes Bridge Michigan; Circle of Blue; Great Lakes Now at Detroit Public Television; and Michigan Radio, Michigan’s NPR News Leader; who work together to bring audiences news and information about the impact of climate change, pollution, and aging infrastructure on the Great Lakes and drinking water.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2021/02/michigan-dams-immediate-attention-prevent-next-failure/

Bridge Michigan

With warmer weather in the forecast for the foreseeable future, the United States Coast Guard issued a warning on Thursday afternoon for the public to use caution when it comes to ice conditions on the Great Lakes.  Read the full story by Soo Today.  

Original Article

Great Lakes Commission

Great Lakes Commission

https://www.glc.org/dailynews/20210226-coast-guard

Jill Estrada

Joliet, Illinois, is the latest city to give up on groundwater deep aquifers for their public water supply, voting last month to tap into Lake Michigan water provided by Chicago. Read the full story by the Chicago Tribune.

Original Article

Great Lakes Commission

Great Lakes Commission

https://www.glc.org/dailynews/20210226-joliet-water

Jill Estrada

University of Windsor researchers have received a grant of more than $1 million to collect data and lay the groundwork for establishing an early-warning system to protect water treatment systems in Southwestern Ontario from harmful algal blooms. Read the full story by the Windsor Star.

Original Article

Great Lakes Commission

Great Lakes Commission

https://www.glc.org/dailynews/20210226-habs-funding

Jill Estrada

Waukegan’s $9 million renovation of its century-old water plant, which almost doubled its output capacity, was recently recognized as one of the top projects of 2020 by a multistate professional organization. Read the full story by the Chicago Tribune.

Original Article

Great Lakes Commission

Great Lakes Commission

https://www.glc.org/dailynews/20210226-water-plant

Jill Estrada

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) Office of National Marine Sanctuaries will consider the Lake Erie Quadrangle for national marine sanctuary designation until Feb. 22, 2026, according to a news release issued Thursday. Read the full story by Lake Erie News Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Commission

Great Lakes Commission

https://www.glc.org/dailynews/20210226-erie-designation

Jill Estrada

Ann Arbor, Mich. – A binational coalition of regional agencies, legislators, local communities, tribes, and business and environmental groups today released their shared priorities for restoring the Great Lakes and supporting the region’s economy. 2021 marks the 15th year the coalition has issued shared priorities for the lakes in advance of Great Lakes Day. Great Lakes Day, which will take place virtually next week, is an annual event that brings together regional leaders and members of Congress who play a critical role in shaping Great Lakes policies.

“Restoring and protecting the Great Lakes is an enduring, bipartisan priority for the nation and for Great Lakes basin communities,” the statement reads. “Our organizations support these priorities to accelerate progress, foster equity, build resilience, and ensure the Great Lakes are an environmental treasure, community asset, economic engine, and innovation hub.”

The agenda urges Congress and the Biden administration to appropriate no less than $375 million for the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative in FY 2022. In addition, the statement calls for investments in drinking water, wastewater and stormwater infrastructure; prioritization of projects and programs in underserved communities to advance equitable access to affordable, clean, safe drinking water; ensuring the Great Lakes region is resilient to the impacts of a changing climate; strengthening Great Lakes ports and the maritime transportation system; supporting federal programs to address harmful algal blooms; and protecting the Great Lakes from Asian carp and other aquatic invasive species.

The 2021 Great Lakes priorities are endorsed by the Great Lakes CommissionGreat Lakes Fishery Commission, Healing Our Waters-Great Lakes CoalitionGreat Lakes and St. Lawrence Cities InitiativeChippewa Ottawa Resource AuthorityGreat Lakes Metro Chambers CoalitionAmerican Great Lakes Ports Association, and Great Lakes-St. Lawrence Legislative Caucus.

Original Article

Great Lakes Commission

Great Lakes Commission

https://www.glc.org/news/regional-priorities-022521

Beth Wanamaker

HotSpots H2O: Minnesota Rolls Out Plan for PFAS Contamination

By Elena Bruess, Circle of Blue

The Great Lakes News Collaborative includes Bridge Michigan; Circle of Blue; Great Lakes Now at Detroit Public Television; and Michigan Radio, Michigan’s NPR News Leader; who work together to bring audiences news and information about the impact of climate change, pollution, and aging infrastructure on the Great Lakes and drinking water.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2021/02/minnesota-plan-pfas-contamination/

Circle of Blue

Three Wisconsin roads have received new National Scenic Byway designations from the Federal Highway Administration, cementing them as some of the state’s best places for scenic drives. The Wisconsin Lake Superior Scenic Byway and Door County Coastal Byway have both been declared National Scenic Byways. Read the full story by the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel.

Original Article

Great Lakes Commission

Great Lakes Commission

https://www.glc.org/dailynews/20210225-wisconsin-routes

Ken Gibbons

Historic Fishtown, one of northwest Lower Michigan’s scenic gems, is highlighted in a new video advertisement for Carhartt and Guinness. The two brands collaborated for a St. Patrick’s Day-themed piece that highlights hard work, a wintry northern Michigan vibe and St. Patrick’s Day. Read the full story by the Traverse City Record-Eagle.

Original Article

Great Lakes Commission

Great Lakes Commission

https://www.glc.org/dailynews/20210225-fishtown

Ken Gibbons

Cleanup on the Kalamazoo River is about to begin after a repair project on the Morrow Dam allowed sediment to wash miles downstream. Survey crews were working along the river on Wednesday and the project could start as soon as this weekend. Read the full story by WOOD-TV- Kalamazoo, MI.

Original Article

Great Lakes Commission

Great Lakes Commission

https://www.glc.org/dailynews/20210225-river-sediment

Ken Gibbons

Although several local, regional and Great Lakes-centric walleye plans exist, the Michigan Department of Natural Resources has drafted the first statewide walleye plan focused on inland waters — and is asking the public’s help in finalizing it. Read the full story by the Iron Mountain Daily News.

Original Article

Great Lakes Commission

Great Lakes Commission

https://www.glc.org/dailynews/20210225-walleye-plan

Ken Gibbons

Enbridge Line 3 divides Indigenous lands, people

CLOQUET, Minn. (AP) — Jason Goward was overjoyed to get a high-paying job on Enbridge’s Line 3 pipeline project.

The job, clearing ground with a contractor for the Canadian energy company, meant he could at last pay child support for his two young sons.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2021/02/ap-enbridge-line-3-divides-indigenous-lands-people/

The Associated Press

Cross-border Concerns: Biden administration a new opportunity for Canadian cooperation over Great Lakes

Great Lakes watchers were pleased that newly elected President Joe Biden’s first phone call to a foreign leader went to Canada’s Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, hoping the call signals the beginning of more harmonious relations in the basin.

The previous four years under Donald Trump had been rocky.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2021/02/cross-border-biden-administration-canada-cooperation-great-lakes/

Andrew Reeves

Legislation to simplify seawall permitting during high water periods on the Great Lakes and codify the state’s authority to regulate beach structures set off conflicts between Republicans who are upset the bill no longer allow property owners to install erosion protections without getting a permit. Read the full story by MLive.

Original Article

Great Lakes Commission

Great Lakes Commission

https://www.glc.org/dailynews/20210223-thunder-bay

Ned Willig

American shipping companies operating the U.S. Great Lakes fleet will invest nearly $87 million at shipyards and facilities across the region this year, according to new figures released by the Lake Carriers’ Association. Annual maintenance work to the U.S. “laker” vessels allows ships that are 40 and 50 years old, or even older, to continue to sail the Great Lakes. Read the full story by Lake Superior News.

Original Article

Great Lakes Commission

Great Lakes Commission

https://www.glc.org/dailynews/20210224-laker-upgrades

Ned Willig

An old amusement park in Ohio will see new life as a public park and wetland as it is repurposed to help reduce algal blooms from Chippewa Lake, Ohio’s largest glacial lake. The project is supported by the H2Ohio initiative. Read the full story by the Great Lakes Echo.

Original Article

Great Lakes Commission

Great Lakes Commission

https://www.glc.org/dailynews/20210224-ohio-amusement-park

Ned Willig

The Minnesota Pollution Control Agency wants to change the rules on water quality to increase the agency’s flexibility in classifying water quality as degraded. The rule changes are supported by numerous industry groups but have been opposed by environmental and tribal stakeholders. Read the full story by MinnPost.

Original Article

Great Lakes Commission

Great Lakes Commission

https://www.glc.org/dailynews/20210224-mn-wq-rules

Ned Willig

The Nature Conservancy began work on an ecosystem restoration project in Ohio. The 280-acre Sandhill Crane Wetlands project will restore a portion of the historic Irwin Wet Prairie, which played a role in naturally treating nutrient runoff into nearby streams which led to Lake Erie. Read the full story by WTOL-TV — Toledo, OH.

Original Article

Great Lakes Commission

Great Lakes Commission

https://www.glc.org/dailynews/20210224-sandhill-crane-wetland

Ned Willig

Canadian federal investments to upgrade water infrastructure in First Nation communities do not require that engineers consider and mitigate climate change-related risks, risking infrastructure failures during extreme weather that would limit indigenous communities’ access to safe drinking water. Read the full story by Canada’s National Observer.

Original Article

Great Lakes Commission

Great Lakes Commission

https://www.glc.org/dailynews/20210224-1st-nations-water

Ned Willig

Restored pine logs from Michigan’s 19th century logging boom were recovered from the bottom of Muskegon Lake and are now being turned into high-end electric guitars used by rock stars like the Rolling Stones and Aerosmith. Read the full story by WZZM-TV — Grand Rapids, MI.

Original Article

Great Lakes Commission

Great Lakes Commission

https://www.glc.org/dailynews/20210224-rock-on-muskegon

Ned Willig

Wisconsin Governor Tony Evers is looking to boost state funds to address and monitor PFAS contamination across Wisconsin in his budget, targeting so-called “forever chemicals” that have been found in all five of Madison’s lakes. Read the full story by The Capital Times.

Original Article

Great Lakes Commission

Great Lakes Commission

https://www.glc.org/dailynews/20210224-pfas-wisc

Ned Willig

A decade after the death of bestselling author and conservationist, Sigurd F. Olson, his son found some of his loose-leaf journals in an unplugged refrigerator. The journals have since been turned into a book that will be published in June.

The post Famed outdoor writer’s journals found in old refrigerator to be published soon first appeared on Great Lakes Echo.

Original Article

Great Lakes Echo

Great Lakes Echo

http://greatlakesecho.org/2021/02/24/famed-outdoor-writers-journals-found-in-old-refrigerator-to-be-published-soon/

Taylor Haelterman

On Monday of this week, Wisconsin Sea Grant and the University of Wisconsin Water Resources Institute (WRI) conducted a fellows convocation and award event that conferred recognition on 20 master’s, Ph.D. or postdoctoral fellows; six undergraduate students who participated in the 2020 Sea Grant Community Engaged Internship Program, one of whom was also the winner of the Weston Scholarship; two federally elected officials; the first-ever Wisconsin Sea Grant Great Lakes Champion Award winner; and two people who have made a big difference in Green Bay estuary and took home the Wisconsin Sea Grant Actionable Science Award.

“It’s not news that COVID-19 has disrupted every part of our lives. Our biennial fellows convocation is just one of innumerable events that could not be held in person, but we were not prepared to let a pandemic stand in the way of honoring student accomplishments, and the contributions of U.S. Sen. Tammy Baldwin and Congressman Mike Gallagher who see the value of investing in, conserving and celebrating our amazing Great Lakes and other Wisconsin water assets,” said Jim Hurley, director of both Sea Grant and WRI.

Hurley acted as emcee of the virtual event that drew more than 70 participants from cities across the Badger State, as well as from spots such as Guam, Washington, D.C., and St. Petersburg, Florida.

“This is the third time we have held a fellows convocation. It was the first time needed to conduct it in a virtual setting. Of course, we wish it could have been in person, but the enthusiasm and well wishes made up for that loss of in-person conviviality. I’m pleased that so many people from near and far could join to celebrate water scholarship and positive impacts in our coastal communities,” he said.

For many years, Sen. Baldwin and Rep. Gallagher have used their positions in Congress to support the mission of Sea Grant and they each joined the event to collect a Friend of Wisconsin Sea Grant Award.

Dean Haen was named Wisconsin Sea Grant Great Lakes Champion for 2021, a new award that will be given every two years going forward to an individual, business, organization or program that demonstrates a long-term commitment to the care and concern for the Great Lakes.  

2021 Wisconsin Sea Grant Great Lakes Champion Award Winner Dean Haen. Photo: Brown County Port

Haen is the director of the Brown County Port and Resource Recovery Department. He was lauded for economic and ecological contributions. More than 200 ships annually visit the port, hauling more than 2 million tons of cargo, generating jobs and economic impact.

Haen has also been integral to the restoration of the Cat Island Chain in Green Bay, which is bringing back 1,200 acres that provide shoreline protection and habitat for endangered reptiles and birds. The chain also acts as a storage facility for material dredged from the shipping lanes, beneficially using material that would otherwise require costly disposal.

The Wisconsin Sea Grant Actionable Science Award was presented to a couple who are not only a team in marriage but also in their devotion to cleanup of the Lower Fox River and Green Bay. Vicky and Hallet J. “Bud” Harris have spent decades in various environmental research and outreach roles and serve as volunteers for state and local conservation groups. Vicky Harris was a longtime Sea Grant water quality and habitat restoration specialist working in the program’s Green Bay Office. Bud Harris is a retired professor of natural and applied sciences at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay.

Bud and Vicky Harris, winners of the 2021 Wisconsin Sea Grant Actionable Science Award. Contributed photo.

As the for the impressive roster of students who received recognition, they fill many roles in many places, including:

-Three Dean John A. Knauss Fellows who each have a master’s degree and have, or will devote a year of service in Washington, D.C., in either the executive or legislative branch on ocean, coastal or Great Lakes topics.

– Eight fellows who have a master’s degree, are working toward a Ph.D. or have recently completed a Ph.D. and are placed, or will soon be placed, with partner state agencies and completing important work such as setting health standards for human exposure to PFAS, determining groundwater levels in central Wisconsin and protecting coastal property and infrastructure. It’s a mutually beneficial agreement that sees the agency gaining cutting-edge knowledge from these young scholars and the young people benefitting from mentors within agencies—the Wisconsin Coastal Management Program, department of administration, department of natural resources or department of health services.

– Four fellows who have a master’s degree, are working toward a Ph.D. or have recently completed a Ph.D. and are placed at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to assess toxicological threats to people and the environment.

– Two students who are engaged in ongoing research, and efforts leading to publications to further share science with a wider community. One fellow is working at the University of Wisconsin Stevens Point Northern Aquaculture Demonstration Facility and the other is based at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, analyzing PFAS in state waters.

-A 2020-21 NOAA Coastal Management Fellow stationed in Guam where she and partners are updating a plan for the Seashore Reserve. Another student is winding down her fellowship with the Wisconsin Coastal Management Program and a third is working to understand and mitigate community flooding with the Association of State Floodplain Managers, a national organization based in Madison.

Celeste Gunderson is a junior working toward degrees in geography and environmental studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. She is the 2021 recipient of the Carl J. Weston Scholarship, made possible by the generous gift of Dr. and Mrs. Carl B. Weston in honor of their son. The scholarship goes to undergraduate student pursuing freshwater studies as part of a Wisconsin Sea Grant project.

Gunderson was also part of a summer community engaged internship program in 2020 that saw another six undergraduates working on issues as diverse as science communication, wild rice conservation flooding and aquatic invasive species. The program is designed to provide diverse students with hands-on experience under the mentorship of a career professional.

 

The post Friends, fellows, undergrads, a champion and a duo of change agents: an afternoon of celebration first appeared on Wisconsin Sea Grant.

Original Article

News Releases – Wisconsin Sea Grant

News Releases – Wisconsin Sea Grant

https://www.seagrant.wisc.edu/news/friends-fellows-undergrads-a-champion-and-a-duo-of-change-agents-an-afternoon-of-celebration/

Moira Harrington

On Monday of this week, Wisconsin Sea Grant and the University of Wisconsin Water Resources Institute (WRI) conducted a fellows convocation and award event that conferred recognition on 20 master’s, Ph.D. or postdoctoral fellows; six undergraduate students who participated in the 2020 Sea Grant Community Engaged Internship Program, one of whom was also the winner of the Weston Scholarship; two federally elected officials; the first-ever Wisconsin Sea Grant Great Lakes Champion Award winner; and two people who have made a big difference in Green Bay estuary and took home the Wisconsin Sea Grant Actionable Science Award.

“It’s not news that COVID-19 has disrupted every part of our lives. Our biennial fellows convocation is just one of innumerable events that could not be held in person, but we were not prepared to let a pandemic stand in the way of honoring student accomplishments, and the contributions of U.S. Sen. Tammy Baldwin and Congressman Mike Gallagher who see the value of investing in, conserving and celebrating our amazing Great Lakes and other Wisconsin water assets,” said Jim Hurley, director of both Sea Grant and WRI.

Hurley acted as emcee of the virtual event that drew more than 70 participants from cities across the Badger State, as well as from spots such as Guam, Washington, D.C., and St. Petersburg, Florida.

“This is the third time we have held a fellows convocation. It was the first time needed to conduct it in a virtual setting. Of course, we wish it could have been in person, but the enthusiasm and well wishes made up for that loss of in-person conviviality. I’m pleased that so many people from near and far could join to celebrate water scholarship and positive impacts in our coastal communities,” he said.

For many years, Sen. Baldwin and Rep. Gallagher have used their positions in Congress to support the mission of Sea Grant and they each joined the event to collect a Friend of Wisconsin Sea Grant Award.

Dean Haen was named Wisconsin Sea Grant Great Lakes Champion for 2021, a new award that will be given every two years going forward to an individual, business, organization or program that demonstrates a long-term commitment to the care and concern for the Great Lakes.  

2021 Wisconsin Sea Grant Great Lakes Champion Award Winner Dean Haen. Photo: Brown County Port

Haen is the director of the Brown County Port and Resource Recovery Department. He was lauded for economic and ecological contributions. More than 200 ships annually visit the port, hauling more than 2 million tons of cargo, generating jobs and economic impact.

Haen has also been integral to the restoration of the Cat Island Chain in Green Bay, which is bringing back 1,200 acres that provide shoreline protection and habitat for endangered reptiles and birds. The chain also acts as a storage facility for material dredged from the shipping lanes, beneficially using material that would otherwise require costly disposal.

The Wisconsin Sea Grant Actionable Science Award was presented to a couple who are not only a team in marriage but also in their devotion to cleanup of the Lower Fox River and Green Bay. Vicky and Hallet J. “Bud” Harris have spent decades in various environmental research and outreach roles and serve as volunteers for state and local conservation groups. Vicky Harris was a longtime Sea Grant water quality and habitat restoration specialist working in the program’s Green Bay Office. Bud Harris is a retired professor of natural and applied sciences at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay.

Bud and Vicky Harris, winners of the 2021 Wisconsin Sea Grant Actionable Science Award. Contributed photo.

As the for the impressive roster of students who received recognition, they fill many roles in many places, including:

-Three Dean John A. Knauss Fellows who each have a master’s degree and have, or will devote a year of service in Washington, D.C., in either the executive or legislative branch on ocean, coastal or Great Lakes topics.

– Eight fellows who have a master’s degree, are working toward a Ph.D. or have recently completed a Ph.D. and are placed, or will soon be placed, with partner state agencies and completing important work such as setting health standards for human exposure to PFAS, determining groundwater levels in central Wisconsin and protecting coastal property and infrastructure. It’s a mutually beneficial agreement that sees the agency gaining cutting-edge knowledge from these young scholars and the young people benefitting from mentors within agencies—the Wisconsin Coastal Management Program, department of administration, department of natural resources or department of health services.

– Four fellows who have a master’s degree, are working toward a Ph.D. or have recently completed a Ph.D. and are placed at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to assess toxicological threats to people and the environment.

– Two students who are engaged in ongoing research, and efforts leading to publications to further share science with a wider community. One fellow is working at the University of Wisconsin Stevens Point Northern Aquaculture Demonstration Facility and the other is based at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, analyzing PFAS in state waters.

-A 2020-21 NOAA Coastal Management Fellow stationed in Guam where she and partners are updating a plan for the Seashore Reserve. Another student is winding down her fellowship with the Wisconsin Coastal Management Program and a third is working to understand and mitigate community flooding with the Association of State Floodplain Managers, a national organization based in Madison.

Celeste Gunderson is a junior working toward degrees in geography and environmental studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. She is the 2021 recipient of the Carl J. Weston Scholarship, made possible by the generous gift of Dr. and Mrs. Carl B. Weston in honor of their son. The scholarship goes to undergraduate student pursuing freshwater studies as part of a Wisconsin Sea Grant project.

Gunderson was also part of a summer community engaged internship program in 2020 that saw another six undergraduates working on issues as diverse as science communication, wild rice conservation flooding and aquatic invasive species. The program is designed to provide diverse students with hands-on experience under the mentorship of a career professional.

 

The post Friends, fellows, undergrads, a champion and a duo of change agents: an afternoon of celebration first appeared on Wisconsin Sea Grant.

Original Article

News Releases – Wisconsin Sea Grant

News Releases – Wisconsin Sea Grant

https://www.seagrant.wisc.edu/news/friends-fellows-undergrads-a-champion-and-a-duo-of-change-agents-an-afternoon-of-celebration/

Moira Harrington

...HAZARDOUS TRAVEL CONDITIONS ACROSS NORTHERN AND PORTIONS OF CENTRAL AND EAST-CENTRAL WISCONSIN EARLY THIS MORNING... At 315 am, radar indicated a band of light to moderate precipitation continuing across northern Wisconsin, generally north of Highway 29 which runs from Wausau to Shawano to Green Bay to Kewaunee. The precipitation was a mix of light snow and

Original Article

Current Watches, Warnings and Advisories for Brown (WIC009) Wisconsin Issued by the National Weather Service

Current Watches, Warnings and Advisories for Brown (WIC009) Wisconsin Issued by the National Weather Service

https://alerts.weather.gov/cap/wwacapget.php?x=WI12618F3A5554.SpecialWeatherStatement.12618F3AC0C0WI.GRBSPSGRB.cacb0ae376626c061b4519ac7e028b39

w-nws.webmaster@noaa.gov

...HAZARDOUS TRAVEL CONDITIONS ACROSS NORTHERN AND PORTIONS OF CENTRAL AND EAST-CENTRAL WISCONSIN OVERNIGHT... At 130 am, radar indicated a band of light to moderate precipitation across northern Wisconsin, generally north of Highway 29 which runs from Wausau to Shawano to Green Bay to Kewaunee. The precipitation was generally snow in central, north-

Original Article

Current Watches, Warnings and Advisories for Brown (WIC009) Wisconsin Issued by the National Weather Service

Current Watches, Warnings and Advisories for Brown (WIC009) Wisconsin Issued by the National Weather Service

https://alerts.weather.gov/cap/wwacapget.php?x=WI12618F3A0DD8.SpecialWeatherStatement.12618F3A5748WI.GRBSPSGRB.cacb0ae376626c061b4519ac7e028b39

w-nws.webmaster@noaa.gov

Wisconsin Water Week—March 8 to 12—is almost upon us, and this year’s theme is “Navigating in Turbulent Times.” A virtual conference organized by the Wisconsin Lakes Partnership will explore many facets of this precious resource and give attendees a chance to network with others interested in water.

Several Wisconsin Sea Grant staff and fellows are involved as presenters, virtual exhibitors or session organizers. To help you take advantage of Sea Grant-connected offerings during Wisconsin Water Week, we’ve pulled together the handy list below.

To learn more about the conference, you can watch a teaser video on YouTube, or view the agenda and registration link.

Wisconsin Sea Grant participation in Wisconsin Water Week 2021:

Exhibitors with booths March 8-10: Sharon Moen (Eat Wisconsin Fish), Anne Moser (Wisconsin Water Library)

Monday, March 8

12-12:45 p.m.
Wisconsin Coastal Management Program and Living on the Edge: Updating the Coastal Processes Manual to Promote Resiliency on Wisconsin’s Great Lakes Shorelines
Speakers: Lydia Salus and Adam Arend

12:45-1:30 p.m. (Exhibitor: Eat Wisconsin Fish)
Let’s eat trout: cooking demo and discussion
Sharon Moen

Tuesday, March 9

10:40-11 a.m. (Exhibitor: Eat Wisconsin Fish)
Wisconsin’s fish farmers and commercial fishers: presentation and discussion
Sharon Moen

3-3:30 p.m. (Exhibitor: Eat Wisconsin Fish)
Let’s eat smoked fish: cooking demo and discussion
Sharon Moen

3:30-4:30 p.m. Lightning talks
AIS Messaging Frames
Speaker: Tim Campbell

Wednesday, March 10

8:30-9:30 a.m. Combined Session
The aquatic invasive species prevention knowledge, behaviors, and beliefs of Wisconsin boaters
Speaker: Tim Campbell

9:30-10 a.m. (Exhibitor: Eat Wisconsin Fish)
Wisconsin’s fish farmers and commercial fishers: presentation and discussion
Sharon Moen

10-11 a.m.
Behind the Scenes of Introduced: a Podcast about Aquatic Invaders and Wisconsin’s Changing Waters
Speakers: Bonnie Willison and Sydney Widell

11 a.m.-noon
Tackling Wisconsin’s Water Challenges through UW Water Science-Policy Fellowships and Agency Partnerships
Speakers: Jen Hauxwell and Aquatic Sciences Center fellows

Noon-12:45 p.m. (Exhibitor: Eat Wisconsin Fish)
Let’s eat lake whitefish: cooking demo and discussion
Sharon Moen

Thursday, March 11

10:35-11:15 a.m.
Tourism futures: adapting outdoor recreation & tourism to climate change & changing visitation in Northern Wisconsin
Moderator/organizer: Natalie Chin

1:15-2:15 p.m.
Building Resilience in the Lake Superior Basin: Using Green Infrastructure & Natural Management to Reduce Flood Impacts
Moderator/organizer: Natalie Chin

1:15-2:15 p.m.
Showcasing the Coastal Resource Hub
Speakers: Deidre Peroff and Amy Lentz

The post Sea Grant staff active in Wisconsin Water Week first appeared on Wisconsin Sea Grant.

Original Article

Blog – Wisconsin Sea Grant

Blog – Wisconsin Sea Grant

https://www.seagrant.wisc.edu/blog/sea-grant-staff-active-in-wisconsin-water-week/

Jennifer Smith

The shipyard in Thunder Bay was purchased in 2017 and became part of the Heddle trajectory of growth from Hamilton, Newfoundland, Thunder Bay and then Port Weller in St. Catherine, opening what Ted Kirkpatrick, Heddle’s director of business, called a “good fit.”  Read the full story by the Thunder Bay Chronicle Journal.

Original Article

Great Lakes Commission

Great Lakes Commission

https://www.glc.org/dailynews/20210223-thunder-bay

Ken Gibbons

With diving the warmer waters of international tropical destinations off the table this year and Humber Bay now the only water not frozen over, this is where Mark has been heading for weekly dives. And he figures he might as well help with some trash clean-up while he’s down there. Read the full story by blogTO.

Original Article

Great Lakes Commission

Great Lakes Commission

https://www.glc.org/dailynews/20210223-toronto

Ken Gibbons

There was a big drop in Great Lakes ice extent on Monday. The Great Lakes as a whole dropped from 42.9% to 34.6%. This was mainly due to brisk winds breaking up the ice and we may have seen our greatest ice extent this winter. Read the full story by WOOD-TV- Grand Rapids, MI.

Original Article

Great Lakes Commission

Great Lakes Commission

https://www.glc.org/dailynews/20210223-ice-break-up

Ken Gibbons

Just over a year ago, the now-famous English Bulldog named ‘Tuff’ fell through the ice, but was saved thanks to the South Milwaukee Fire Department. Following Tuff’s rescue, the fire department launched a fundraiser to purchase water rescue equipment and to make a donation to the K9 for Warriors organization. Read the full story by WTMJ-TV- Milwaukee, WI.

Original Article

Great Lakes Commission

Great Lakes Commission

https://www.glc.org/dailynews/20210223-fire-department

Ken Gibbons

The recent cold spell has meant ice fishing at more lakes in Michigan. Some anglers go after a tiny fish called smelt in the cold water. In the past, people went after them during spawning runs using dip nets. But smelt populations have crashed. Read the full story by the Associated Press.

Original Article

Great Lakes Commission

Great Lakes Commission

https://www.glc.org/dailynews/20210223-smelt-population

Ken Gibbons

In 2014 and 2015 the Apostle Islands Ice Caves drew thousands of people to the icy shores of Lake Superior. However, despite the recent cold snap, the National Park Service says the lake ice isn’t stable enough to allow people to view the ice caves. Opportunities to view the ice caves from frozen Lake Superior are becoming rarer. Read the full story by WXPR-Rhinelander, WI.

Original Article

Great Lakes Commission

Great Lakes Commission

https://www.glc.org/dailynews/20210223-apostle-island

Ken Gibbons