It’s taken over 30 years and $80 million to restore Muskegon Lake and a few nearby smaller bodies of water.

Decades of pollution and rapid urbanization created ecological problems so severe that the lake was designated a “Great Lakes Area of Concern” by the U.S. and Canada in 1987.

The post Community input sought for cleaned-up lakes, shorelines first appeared on Great Lakes Echo.

Original Article

Great Lakes Echo

Great Lakes Echo

http://greatlakesecho.org/2024/05/17/community-input-sought-for-cleaned-up-lakes-shorelines/

Guest Contributor

Look fast or you may miss an elusive 170-year-old sunken schooner off the coast of Baileys Harbor, Wisconsin.

The mostly intact shipwreck, which was added to the National Register of Historic Places in early April, isn’t always visible, even though it’s in very shallow waters, said Tamara Thomsen, a Wisconsin Historical Society maritime archaeologist.

The post Old Lake Michigan shipwreck visible again after burial under sand first appeared on Great Lakes Echo.

Original Article

Great Lakes Echo

Great Lakes Echo

http://greatlakesecho.org/2024/05/14/old-lake-michigan-shipwreck-visible-again-after-burial-under-sand/

Clara Lincolnhol

Like clockwork, Michigan’s Ford Lake and its downstream neighbor, Belleville Lake, turn bright green every summer due to harmful algal blooms.

The lakes, located near Ypsilanti in the southeast part of the state, have struggled for decades with phosphorus pollution that spurs algae growth.

The post Dams may power a stop harmful algal blooms in urban lakes, expert says first appeared on Great Lakes Echo.

Original Article

Great Lakes Echo

Great Lakes Echo

http://greatlakesecho.org/2024/05/10/dams-may-power-a-stop-harmful-algal-blooms-in-urban-lakes-expert-says/

Elinor Epperson

Fifty-five years after the Cuyahoga River last caught fire, its health continues to improve.

But determining what prevention and cleanup practices are most effective remains difficult. 

The post Cuyahoga comeback: Remediation is working but it’s hard to measure first appeared on Great Lakes Echo.

Original Article

Great Lakes Echo

Great Lakes Echo

http://greatlakesecho.org/2024/05/08/cuyahoga-comeback-remediation-is-working-but-its-hard-to-measure/

Elinor Epperson

The Mississippi River Basin and the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence River Basin supply freshwater and drain wastewater for millions of people.

Two of the largest watersheds in the U.S., they span state and political boundaries. 

The post Covering watershed policy and identity first appeared on Great Lakes Echo.

Original Article

Great Lakes Echo

Great Lakes Echo

http://greatlakesecho.org/2024/04/22/covering-watershed-policy-and-identity/

Kayla Nelsen

A worrisome environmental issue is bubbling up from deep below Michigan’s ground with little public awareness, experts say.

The salinity of the state’s groundwater is on the rise, raising concerns about killed crops and corroded pipes.

The post Salty groundwater in Michigan could hurt agriculture, business and homeowners first appeared on Great Lakes Echo.

Original Article

Great Lakes Echo

Great Lakes Echo

http://greatlakesecho.org/2024/04/15/salty-groundwater-in-michigan-could-hurt-agriculture-business-and-homeowners/

Guest Contributor

Global warming is fueling the spread of a jellyfish in the Great Lakes region and may foster harmful algae blooms and dead zones.

The peach blossom jellyfish is native to warm freshwater in Southeast China, but it is present everywhere around the world except for Antarctica.

The post Citizen science may help uncover the mysteries of Great Lakes invasion of jellyfish first appeared on Great Lakes Echo.

Original Article

Great Lakes Echo

Great Lakes Echo

http://greatlakesecho.org/2024/04/10/citizen-science-may-help-uncover-the-mysteries-of-great-lakes-invasion-of-jellyfish/

Kayla Nelsen

Every fish studied recently in two southeast Michigan watersheds contained at least one of a family of toxic and persistent health-threatening chemicals.

The chemicals - collectively known as per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances or PFAS - are found in some rivers, lakes, soils, drinking water, fish, cattle and crops.

The post High levels of toxic forever chemicals in Michigan fish alarm scientists first appeared on Great Lakes Echo.

Original Article

Great Lakes Echo

Great Lakes Echo

http://greatlakesecho.org/2024/03/26/high-levels-of-toxic-forever-chemicals-in-michigan-fish-alarm-scientists/

Guest Contributor

Sitting at 26 miles long and 24 miles wide with nearly one-third of the sport fishing catch annually in the Great Lakes region, Lake St. Clair should be a household name. 

Author Daniel Harrison would tell you it's his hidden jewel. 

The post An underappreciated lake that’s great first appeared on Great Lakes Echo.

Original Article

Great Lakes Echo

Great Lakes Echo

http://greatlakesecho.org/2024/03/20/an-underappreciated-lake-thats-great/

Anna Barnes

Being a state with direct access to a lot of freshwater creates opportunities for housing, jobs and tourism. 

However, the quality of Michigan’s water is threatened due to poorly maintained septic tanks, according to environmental advocates pushing for legislation to require periodic inspections of septic systems statewide.

The post Some want Michigan to regulate septic tanks to protect water quality first appeared on Great Lakes Echo.

Original Article

Great Lakes Echo

Great Lakes Echo

http://greatlakesecho.org/2024/03/13/some-want-michigan-to-regulate-septic-tanks-to-protect-water-quality/

Guest Contributor

It takes two to three hours for Kevin Villalta to filter and distill a gallon of tap water, and he says the process is as expensive as it is time-consuming.

But it’s worth it, said the Lansing environmental engineer, who works for the Department of Environment, Great Lakes and Energy. 

The post Some in Michigan hoping to change minds about drinking water and fluoridation first appeared on Great Lakes Echo.

Original Article

Great Lakes Echo

Great Lakes Echo

http://greatlakesecho.org/2024/02/13/some-in-michigan-hoping-to-change-minds-about-drinking-water-and-fluoridation/

Guest Contributor

ake Erie is the first of the Great Lakes getting connected to the internet with a series of offshore “smart” buoys.

And it’s not just for sending texts on the water.

The post Smart buoys help brace Great Lakes for environmental challenges first appeared on Great Lakes Echo.

Original Article

Great Lakes Echo

Great Lakes Echo

http://greatlakesecho.org/2024/01/30/smart-buoys-help-brace-great-lakes-for-environmental-challenges/

Daniel Schoenherr

Residents of major Great Lakes cities, including Lansing, are using less water, a trend that has economic, societal and environmental implications, a new study found.

And the relationship between per capita water use and socioeconomic factors such as income and race may prove significant as policymakers address inequities in the distribution and affordability of water

The post Water consumption drops in Great Lake cities, study finds first appeared on Great Lakes Echo.

Original Article

Great Lakes Echo

Great Lakes Echo

http://greatlakesecho.org/2023/12/01/water-consumption-drops-in-great-lake-cities-study-finds/

Eric Freedman

As lakes and rivers cool with the arrival of fall, avid swimmers may be at risk for illnesses due to contact with contaminated water.

That’s because of a health threat from Escherichia coli – familiarly known as E. coli.

The post Blame the geese – E. coli closes beaches first appeared on Great Lakes Echo.

Original Article

Great Lakes Echo

Great Lakes Echo

http://greatlakesecho.org/2023/10/07/blame-the-geese-e-coli-closes-beaches/

Guest Contributor

Book Review: Scientist offers positive vision to avoid dystopian future in “The Three Ages of Water”

We are at a choice point when it comes to our relationship with water, says noted water expert Peter Gleick.

We can continue on our current path, which has evolved over centuries and includes unsustainable water use and ecological destruction. Both further worsened as we grapple with the effects of climate change.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2023/07/book-review-water-scientist-offers-positive-vision-avoid-dystopian-future/

Gary Wilson

By Jada Vasser A new book about the Great Lakes is written to reflect that their problems, solutions and champions are interrelated, much like the ecosystem it portrays. “This whole thing of bringing stakeholders together, creating a vision, co-producing knowledge, co-innovating solutions is in the book,” author John Hartig said. “You don’t get that anywhere […]

The post Great Lakes champs are part of the ecosystem they protect first appeared on Great Lakes Echo.

Original Article

Great Lakes Echo

Great Lakes Echo

http://greatlakesecho.org/2023/05/18/great-lakes-champs-are-part-of-the-ecosystem-they-protect/

Guest Contributor

Ensuring Your Water Garden Doesn’t Harbor Invasive Plants

As you’re choosing your plants for your water gardens and backyards this spring, be sure you aren’t accidentally growing an invasive plant that could do harm to our lakes and rivers! But don’t take our word for it! Here’s some tips from Melinda Myers, nationally known gardening educator, horticulturist, arborist, author, speaker, and TV/radio host with more than 30 years of horticulture experience!

Questions? Comments? Contact Chris Acy, the AIS Coordinator covering Brown, Outagamie, Fond du Lac, Calumet, and Winnebago Counties at (920) 460-3674 or chris@fwwa.org!

Follow the Fox Wolf Watershed Alliance’s Winnebago Waterways Program on our Winnebago Waterways Facebook page or @WinnWaterways on Twitter! You can also sign-up for email updates at WinnebagoWaterways.org.

Winnebago Waterways is a Fox-Wolf Watershed Alliance program. The Fox-Wolf Watershed Alliance is an independent nonprofit organization that identifies and advocates effective policies and actions that protect, restore, and sustain water resources in the Fox-Wolf River Basin.

Check out the Keepers of the Fox Program at https://fwwa.org/watershed-recovery/lower-fox-recovery/

Reporting invasive species is a first step in containing their spread. Maintaining and restoring our waters and landscapes can reduce the impacts even when we don’t have other management options to an invasive species.

The post What’s That Plant? Know What’s In Your Water Garden appeared first on Fox-Wolf Watershed Alliance.

Original Article

Fox-Wolf Watershed Alliance

Fox-Wolf Watershed Alliance

https://fwwa.org/2023/05/11/whats-that-plant-know-whats-in-your-water-garden/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=whats-that-plant-know-whats-in-your-water-garden

Chris Acy

Ice out on Lake Winnebago was officially called by the Army Corps of Engineers on April 6, 2023 as determined by MODIS satellite imagery. Ice out (aka ice off) is when ALL ice is gone from the lake surface as observed by satellite.  This is important because ice out marks the date that the Army Corps transitions their management of Lake Winnebago from maintaining winter pool to focus on spring refill.

Ice out dates for Lake Winnebago 2006 to 2023 (Source: ACOE)

The Army Corps of Engineers – Chicago District manages water levels for Lake Winnebago by regulating outflow at the dams in Menasha and Neenah under the Federal Marshall Order of 1886. The Marshall Order is intended for flood risk management.

The Marshall Order defines the limits of regulation for Lake Winnebago:

  • May 1st to October 1st (navigation season):
    • High end of limit: 3.45 ft.
    • Low end of limit: 0.18 ft.
  • October 2nd to April 30th:
    • High end of limit: 3.45 ft.
    • Low end of limit: 1.68 ft

While meeting their mission of flood risk management is the priority, the Army Corps also tries to meet the needs of various stakeholders within their operating limits. This requires finding a reasonable balance among multiple competing interests. Each year, with stakeholder input, the Army Corps sets their annual regulation strategy which guides their daily management decisions.

Their annual regulation strategy represents that balance and can be broken down by certain times of the year: fall drawdown, winter pool, spring refill, and summer pool. Water level targets are set along this strategy in a schedule. These targets are listed in the Army Corps 2022 – 2023 Lake Winnebago Regulation Strategy (shown in the image below). The green band in the annual strategy represents the “target band”. The Army Corps tries to hold water levels within this band. The dotted lines represents the average lake level across all years as noted in the key.

Average Water Level for Lake Winnebago

Lake level for Lake Winnebago is an average of readings from four gages located around the lake and is in reference to the Oshkosh Datum.

Fall Drawdown: As of the 2021/2022 regulation strategy, fall drawdown has been scheduled to begin between Sept 1 and Oct 1 each year at the discretion of the Army Corps through an adaptive decision making process.

Winter Pool: Each February, the Army Corps evaluates basin conditions and the forecast to determine their winter drawdown target.

The Army Corps draws down Lake Winnebago every winter to reduce the risk of damage caused by ice shoves, protect shoreline properties, and provide enough space within the lake to hold excess water that flows into Lake Winnebago each spring (snow melt and rain storm runoff from a 5,900 square mile watershed). The 2023 winter drawdown target operating band for Lake Winnebago this year was 1.25 ft to 1.3 ft.

Spring refill: When the Army Corps determines ice out has occurred on Lake Winnebago based on satellite imagery, spring refill is triggered. For many boaters, people interested in habitat protection, and stakeholders working to restore the lakes, refill is of particular interest. According to the most recent annual strategy, refill targets are as follows:

  • May 1st – 2.5 ft (Operating band: 2.4 to 3.6 ft)
  • June 1st – 2.8 ft (Operating band: 2.7 to 3.9 ft)
  • June 15th – 2.9 ft (Operating band: 2.8 to 3.0 ft)

Summer Pool: The Army Corps tries to maintain the lake within a target band for summer recreation navigation.

The total seasonal water elevation change is typically about 1.8 ft in a given year.

Recent conditions:

Despite having all available gates open at the dams since March 6, 2023, the average level of Lake Winnebago has been well above the target band since the beginning of April. This is likely due to the lake not being drawn down far enough or early enough to accommodate spring runoff from snow melt and precipitation. When inflows to Lake Winnebago exceed outflow capacity of the gates, the lake begins to rise uncontrolled. Overshooting the target band increases risk of flooding, significantly damages habitat and limits water quality restoration gains (among other impacts).

A graph from April 21, 2023 shows the recent average lake level (dashed line). Hopefully, precipitation will ease up and the Army Corps will be able to regain control before too much damage is done to the wetlands and aquatic habitat.

Additional Water Level Related Information:

1.) Water Level Management for the Winnebago Waterways: This report describes water level management including the process of developing an annual strategy, the considerations for the strategy, and the reason the strategy (schedule) is in its current form. CLICK HERE for the report.

This report is part of a larger planning effort for the Winnebago Lakes. The rest of the lake plan can be found here: https://fwwa.org/lake-management-planning-2/

2.) Winnebago Water Level Assessment Team (WWLAT): This is a stakeholder group that holds discussions about water levels independent of the Army Corps public input process. The website for the Team provides information about the background, past recommendations, and more. Interested stakeholders are welcome to participate. Link: https://fwwa.org/winnebago-waterways/wwlat/

3.) The Army Corps provides access to a lot of data and information through their Lake Winnebago webpage: CLICK HERE

Winnebago Waterways is a Fox-Wolf Watershed Alliance recovery initiative. Contact us at wwinfo@fwwa.org

The post Ice-Out officially called for Lake Winnebago – April 6, 2023 appeared first on Fox-Wolf Watershed Alliance.

Original Article

Fox-Wolf Watershed Alliance

Fox-Wolf Watershed Alliance

https://fwwa.org/2023/04/27/ice-out-officially-called-for-lake-winnebago-april-6-2023/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=ice-out-officially-called-for-lake-winnebago-april-6-2023

Korin Doering

Walleye and pike surveys start in early spring, followed by muskie surveys. In May, the DNR starts surveying general fish communities like panfish and bass, and from July to September it surveys streams.

The post Shocking news for Michigan fish first appeared on Great Lakes Echo.

Original Article

Great Lakes Echo

Great Lakes Echo

http://greatlakesecho.org/2023/04/27/shocking-news-for-michigan-fish/

Guest Contributor

Former U.N. adviser warns on water futures trading, elevates water crisis to level of climate

There were two differing visions on how to deal with the global water crisis at the recent United Nations World Water Conference, according to former U.N. water adviser Maude Barlow.

One, would “treat water as a commodity like oil and gas and put it on the open market for sale,” Barlow said.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2023/04/former-adviser-warns-water-futures-trading-water-crisis-level-climate/

Gary Wilson

Great Lakes Take Global Stage

By Brett Walton, Circle of Blue

The Great Lakes News Collaborative includes Bridge Michigan; Circle of Blue; Great Lakes Now at Detroit Public Television; and Michigan Radio, Michigan’s NPR News Leader; who work together to bring audiences news and information about the impact of climate change, pollution, and aging infrastructure on the Great Lakes and drinking water.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2023/04/great-lakes-take-global-stage/

Circle of Blue

Detroiters can get another 1,125 gallons of water under discount program

This article was republished here with permission from Great Lakes Echo.

By Vladislava Sukhanovskaya, Great Lakes Echo

The city of Detroit and a nonprofit agency recently added 1,125 gallons of water per person per month to a program that prevents water shut-offs in low-income households.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2023/03/detroiters-can-get-another-1125-gallons-of-water-under-discount-program/

Great Lakes Echo

Detroit water rates have gone up 407% over the last 20 years, and 120% in just the last 10 years.

The post Detroiters can get another 1,125 gallons of water under discount program first appeared on Great Lakes Echo.

Original Article

Great Lakes Echo

Great Lakes Echo

http://greatlakesecho.org/2023/02/28/detroiters-can-get-another-1125-gallons-of-water-under-discount-program/

Vladislava Sukhanovskaya

Hope springs eternal for Michigan legislator who champions drinking water equity

In 2014, Detroit and Michigan received international attention on a water issue, but it wasn’t the spotlight either would have wanted.

The United Nations dispatched an official human rights rapporteur to Detroit to document the harm caused by water shutoffs based on the inability to pay. “There was no water for food or toilets or for care of the elderly or kids, people had to go to public parks and put water in cans,” water rights advocate Maude Barlow told Great Lakes Now in a 2022 interview.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2023/02/hope-springs-eternal-for-michigan-legislator-who-champions-drinking-water-equity/

Gary Wilson

New U.S. Climate Law Could Make Midwest Water Contamination Worse

By Keith Schneider, Circle of Blue

The Great Lakes News Collaborative includes Bridge Michigan; Circle of Blue; Great Lakes Now at Detroit Public Television; and Michigan Radio, Michigan’s NPR News Leader; who work together to bring audiences news and information about the impact of climate change, pollution, and aging infrastructure on the Great Lakes and drinking water.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2023/02/new-u-s-climate-law-could-make-midwest-water-contamination-worse/

Circle of Blue

Book chronicles human, water connection from nomadic to modern times

If you want to peg the date when humans began the trek to modernity facilitated by a relationship to water, start 10,000 years ago, says Giulio Boccaletti, author of Water: A Biography. That’s when nomads became settlers, began farming and their existence started to depend on rivers and streams.

The book continues through the millennia to modern times when America constructed the Hoover Dam and created the Tennessee Valley Authority which Boccaletti says “became a model for the world.”

Boccaletti is a scientist and an honorary research associate at the Smith School of Enterprise and the Environment at University of Oxford.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2023/01/book-chronicles-human-water-connection-from-nomadic-to-modern-times/

Gary Wilson

Multi-state group prepares Great Lakes basin for effects of climate change

Climate change is already affecting the Great Lakes. One group is urging the Great Lakes states and Canadian provinces to coordinate their efforts to make the Great Lakes basin more resilient to those changes.

Climate change contributed to the rapid rise in Great Lakes water levels a few years ago.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2023/01/group-great-lakes-basin-effects-climate-change/

Michigan Radio

Until now, such a two-year water quality environmental technology degree was nonexistent.

The post New Northwestern Michigan College two-year degree readies students for water technology jobs first appeared on Great Lakes Echo.

Original Article

Great Lakes Echo

Great Lakes Echo

http://greatlakesecho.org/2023/01/13/new-northwestern-michigan-college-two-year-degree-readies-students-for-water-technology-jobs/

Guest Contributor

Join Bridge, Circle of Blue to discuss Michigan lawmakers’ water priorities

By Rebecca Fedewa, Bridge Michigan

The Great Lakes News Collaborative includes Bridge Michigan; Circle of Blue; Great Lakes Now at Detroit Public Television; and Michigan Radio, Michigan’s NPR News Leader; who work together to bring audiences news and information about the impact of climate change, pollution, and aging infrastructure on the Great Lakes and drinking water.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2023/01/bridge-circle-of-blue-discuss-michigan-water-priorities/

Bridge Michigan

Michigan, Ohio and Pennsylvania have each received a $25 million grant from the federal government through the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act to plug orphan wells.

The post Federal funds aid efforts to plug orphan wells first appeared on Great Lakes Echo.

Original Article

Great Lakes Echo

Great Lakes Echo

http://greatlakesecho.org/2023/01/05/federal-funds-aid-efforts-to-plug-orphan-wells/

Guest Contributor

Into October, there were higher air temperatures in the entire northwest region than ever before.

The post Lake Erie algae in 2022 worse than predicted; it plateaued rather than peaked first appeared on Great Lakes Echo.

Original Article

Great Lakes Echo

Great Lakes Echo

http://greatlakesecho.org/2023/01/02/lake-erie-algae-in-2022-worse-than-predicted-it-plateaued-rather-than-peaked/

Guest Contributor

Measurements from a 2021 study show that Lake Michigan’s salt content has risen up to fifteen times its natural level since the 1800s, but the effects of these high levels are only now being understood.

The post Volunteers find high road salt levels in Michigan waterways first appeared on Great Lakes Echo.

Original Article

Great Lakes Echo

Great Lakes Echo

http://greatlakesecho.org/2022/12/28/volunteers-find-high-road-salt-levels-in-michigan-waterways/

Guest Contributor

The initiative took a holistic approach in developing Kernza, thinking about how the plant could benefit farmers and the environment.

The post Perennial grains: great for beer, bread and the fight against climate change first appeared on Great Lakes Echo.

Original Article

Great Lakes Echo

Great Lakes Echo

http://greatlakesecho.org/2022/12/19/perennial-grains-great-for-beer-bread-and-the-fight-against-climate-change/

Guest Contributor

A Michigan State University study estimates that up to $5.9 million annually in economic activity is lost in Michigan’s small portion of Lake Erie due to harmful algal blooms.

The post Lake Erie algae mucks up fishing trips first appeared on Great Lakes Echo.

Original Article

Great Lakes Echo

Great Lakes Echo

http://greatlakesecho.org/2022/12/15/lake-erie-algae-mucks-up-fishing-trips/

Guest Contributor

When we were thinking about a new museum devoted to one of the most beautiful and interesting things on our planet – ice – we had to think hard about how best to display and preserve this delicate substance. So welcome to the Museum of Ice, Michigan’s largest museum, open daily (weather permitting) between December and March. Just step outside anywhere in the state and you’re in the museum.

The post December: A Visit to the Museum of Ice first appeared on Great Lakes Echo.

Original Article

Great Lakes Echo

Great Lakes Echo

http://greatlakesecho.org/2022/12/02/december-a-visit-to-the-museum-of-ice/

Guest Contributor

Universities across the globe are monitoring wastewater on their campuses for viruses like COVID-19. It is a practice that has raised some medical privacy concerns, although researchers say there is no way to link the detection of the virus in wastewater with an individual who is sick. 

The post Don’t hide your poo — and here’s why first appeared on Great Lakes Echo.

Original Article

Great Lakes Echo

Great Lakes Echo

http://greatlakesecho.org/2022/11/30/dont-hide-your-poo-and-heres-why/

Guest Contributor

For the first time, a genome sequence has been developed for an unfamiliar species of harmful algae that’s been blooming in the Great Lakes. 

The post Researchers in Minnesota acquire first genome for doli algal bloom first appeared on Great Lakes Echo.

Original Article

Great Lakes Echo

Great Lakes Echo

http://greatlakesecho.org/2022/11/28/researchers-in-minnesota-acquire-first-genome-for-doli-algal-bloom/

Guest Contributor

Algal blooms are wreaking havoc in Lake Erie, but the Michigan Department of Natural Resources (DNR) has a plan: Wetlands. 

The post Michigan agency plans wetlands to combat algal blooms first appeared on Great Lakes Echo.

Original Article

Great Lakes Echo

Great Lakes Echo

http://greatlakesecho.org/2022/10/25/michigan-agency-plans-wetlands-to-combat-algal-blooms/

Guest Contributor

The Ohio Department of Natural Resources (DNR) and Environmental Protection Agency have demonstrated a new technology designed to reduce harmful algal blooms as part of a wide range of efforts on both sides of the Canada-U.S. border to address the threat of Eutrophication on the Great Lakes and other inland bodies of water.

The post New technology provides hope for the Great Lakes’ polluted waters first appeared on Great Lakes Echo.

Original Article

Great Lakes Echo

Great Lakes Echo

http://greatlakesecho.org/2022/10/12/new-technology-provides-hope-for-the-great-lakes-polluted-waters/

Guest Contributor

A new book details the decades-long cleanup of Detroit's River Rogue, which was once one of the most polluted watersheds in America. However, there is still more work to be done.

The post Book details how a watershed community rescued one of the nation’s most polluted rivers first appeared on Great Lakes Echo.

Original Article

Great Lakes Echo

Great Lakes Echo

http://greatlakesecho.org/2022/10/10/book-details-how-a-watershed-community-rescued-one-of-the-nations-most-polluted-rivers/

Guest Contributor

A University of Windsor graduate student is creating erosion sensors, called transducers, for less than 5% of the commercial cost. The devices help researchers understand how boat wakes erode the shoreline.

The post UWindsor undergrad cuts research costs with DIY erosion sensors first appeared on Great Lakes Echo.

Original Article

Great Lakes Echo

Great Lakes Echo

http://greatlakesecho.org/2022/10/06/uwindsor-undergrad-cuts-research-costs-with-diy-erosion-sensors/

Guest Contributor

Shipping vessels make Lake Superior one of the loudest freshwater lakes in the world, but ice makes it one of the quietest during winter. The winter silence plays a key role in conserving the lake’s marine animals.

The post Study: Why are Lake Superior’s quiet winters so important? first appeared on Great Lakes Echo.

Original Article

Great Lakes Echo

Great Lakes Echo

http://greatlakesecho.org/2022/10/04/study-why-are-lake-superiors-quiet-winters-so-important/

Guest Contributor

Great Lakes News Collaborative nets US Water Prize

In front of an international crowd of water researchers, policymakers, community organizers and other officials, the US Water Alliance announced the Great Lakes News Collaborative as the recipient of the 2022 award for “Outstanding One Water Communication.”

The awards presentation took place during the Alliance’s One Water Summit in Milwaukee.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2022/09/great-lakes-news-collaborative-nets-water-prize/

GLN Editor

An Ottawa County, Michigan, electroplating company and two of its top officers have pleaded guilty to violating the federal Clean Water Act by discharging wastewater with excessive amounts of zinc.

The post Guilty pleas in Clean Water Act prosecution first appeared on Great Lakes Echo.

Original Article

Great Lakes Echo

Great Lakes Echo

http://greatlakesecho.org/2022/09/07/guilty-pleas-in-clean-water-act-prosecution/

Guest Contributor

As anyone who lives in Michigan knows, March and April are the wet months. But like so many things that Anyone knows, this is only about half true. The amount of precipitation (the water in rain and snow) doesn’t change much from month to month in Michigan.

The post August: Dibs on the Water first appeared on Great Lakes Echo.

Original Article

Great Lakes Echo

Great Lakes Echo

http://greatlakesecho.org/2022/08/05/august-dibs-on-the-water/

Guest Contributor

In our newest TikTok, Echo reporter Caroline Miller discusses a recent study that documents the first sighting of an invasive species, European frogbit, in Wisconsin and says that it could threaten native plants, fish and invertebrates.

The post Rising water makes Lake Michigan wetlands vulnerable to invaders: TikTok edition first appeared on Great Lakes Echo.

Original Article

Great Lakes Echo

Great Lakes Echo

http://greatlakesecho.org/2022/07/04/rising-water-makes-lake-michigan-wetlands-vulnerable-to-invaders-tiktok-edition/

Guest Contributor