Contact: 
Lindsey Bacigal, BacigalL@nwf.org, (734) 887-7113   
Jordan Lubetkin, Lubetkin@nwf.org, (734) 904-1589   

Healing Our Waters-Great Lakes Coalition

January 20, 2022 (ANN ARBOR, MICH.)—The U.S. House held a hearing today on two bills that support the restoration of fish and wildlife habitat in the Great Lakes region. The Healing Our Waters-Great Lakes Coalition supports both bills, the Great Lakes Fish and Wildlife Restoration Reauthorization Act of 2021 (H.R. 5973) and the Coastal Habitat Conservation Act of 2021 (R.R. 4092), as an important component of restoring the Great Lakes and the species that rely on it.

“These programs are essential for the successful restoration and protection of the Great Lakes, the many species that rely on them, and the recreational opportunities that so many people enjoy,” said Laura Rubin, director of the Healing Our Waters-Great Lakes Coalition. “Federal investments to restore the Lakes have been producing results, but serious threats remain. Continuing to fund these programs will help us maintain the progress we’re seeing and benefit local communities around the region.”

Kira Davis, a Tribal Citizen of Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians and program director of Conservation Resource Alliance, provided testimony during the virtual hearing, held by the House Natural Resources Committee Subcommittee on Water, Oceans, and Wildlife. Davis is a governance Board member of the Healing Our Waters-Great Lakes Coalition.

“The value of [these bills] … is the recognition and support provided to the vital zones working as a conduit between land and water,” wrote Kira Davis in testimony to the subcommittee (read her testimony). “These zones, such as wetlands, coastlines, riparian corridors, and stream embankments can be overlooked even though these sensitive corridors are where most wildlife, aquatic life and other indicator species thrive. In my culture and by science standards, all is connected, and without addressing impacts to these conduits, we are only creating short term solutions to protect the natural system without considering generations to come.”

The Great Lakes Fish and Wildlife Restoration Reauthorization Act of 2021, sponsored by U.S. Rep. Debbie Dingell (D-Mich.), reauthorizes funding that supports activities such as dam removals, wetland restoration, and species recovery.

The Coastal Habitat Conservation Act of 2021, a national program, supports actions to protect, restore, and enhance coastal habitats, including those in the Great Lakes region.

Since 2004, the Healing Our Waters-Great Lakes Coalition has been harnessing the collective power of more than 170 groups representing millions of people, whose common goal is to restore and protect the Great Lakes. Learn more at HealthyLakes.org or follow us on Twitter @HealthyLakes.

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The post House Holds Hearing on Bills to Restore Great Lakes Habitat  appeared first on Healing Our Waters Coalition.

Original Article

Healing Our Waters Coalition

Healing Our Waters Coalition

https://healthylakes.org/house-holds-hearing-on-bills-to-restore-great-lakes-habitat/

Lindsey Bacigal

PFAS News Roundup: PFAS in Lake Superior fish, two Michigan locations could land on Superfund list

PFAS, short for per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances, are a group of widespread man-made chemicals that don’t break down in the environment or the human body and have been flagged as a major contaminant in sources of water across the country.

Keep up with PFAS-related developments in the Great Lakes area.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2022/01/pfas-news-lake-superior-fish-michigan-superfund-list/

Natasha Blakely

Contact: 
Lindsey Bacigal, BacigalL@nwf.org, (734) 887-7113   
Jordan Lubetkin, Lubetkin@nwf.org, (734) 904-1589   

U.S. House Members Urge Biden to Support Great Lakes Funding 

ANN ARBOR, MICH. (December 21, 2021)—More than 30 U.S. House Democrats and Republicans sent a letter to President Biden yesterday, urging him to include in his 2023 budget at least $400 million for the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative, a federal program to clean up toxic pollution, restore fish and wildlife habitat, reduce runoff pollution, and combat invasive species.  

Laura Rubin, director of the Healing Our Waters-Great Lakes Coalition, said: 

“We thank members of the Great Lakes congressional delegation for continuing to make Great Lakes restoration and protection a national priority. Federal investments to restore and protect the Great Lakes have been producing results in communities across the region, but urgent problems remain. We encourage the Biden Administration to show its support for Great Lakes restoration and protection by fully funding this important program. Now is not the time to falter, or the problems will only get worse and more expensive to solve.”   

Signatories to the House letter include: Debbie Dingell (D-Mich.), Bill Huizenga (R-Mich.), Marcy Kaptur (D-Ohio), Dan Kildee (D-Mich.), Chris Jacobs (R-N.Y.), Jackie Walorski (R-Ind.), Haley Stevens (D-Mich.), Anthony Gonzalez (R-Ohio), Rashida Tlaib (D-Mich.), Mike Kelly (R-Pa.), Gwen Moore (D-Wis.), Peter Meijer (R-Mich.), Brian Higgins (D-N.Y.), Pete Stauber (R-Minn.), Joseph Morelle (D-N.Y.), John Katko (R-N.Y.), Bradley S. Schneider (D-Ill.), Fred Upton (R-Mich.), Bill Foster (D-Ill.), Tim Walberg (R-Mich.), Robin Kelly (D-Ill.), Mike Quigley (D-Ill.), Bryan Steil (R-Wis.), Bobby Rush (D-Ill.), Jesús G. “Chuy” García (D-Ill.), Sean Casten (D-Ill.), Claudia Tenney (R-N.Y.), Marie Newman (D-Ill.), Ilhan Omar (D-Minn.), Jack Bergman (R-Mich.), Mike Gallagher (R-Wis.), Andy Levin (D-Mich.), Lisa McClain (R-Mich.), John Moolenaar (R-Mich.), Jan Schakowsky (D-Ill.), Elise Stefanik (R-N.Y.), and Elissa Slotkin (D-Mich.).  

The Healing Our Waters-Great Lakes Coalition issued a letter recently, urging the Biden Administration to include in its 2023 proposed budget at least $400 million for the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative.  

Since 2004, the Healing Our Waters-Great Lakes Coalition has been harnessing the collective power of more than 170 groups representing millions of people, whose common goal is to restore and protect the Great Lakes. Learn more at HealthyLakes.org or follow us on Twitter @HealthyLakes. 

### 

The post U.S. House Members Urge Biden to Support Great Lakes Funding  appeared first on Healing Our Waters Coalition.

Original Article

Healing Our Waters Coalition

Healing Our Waters Coalition

https://healthylakes.org/u-s-house-members-urge-biden-to-support-great-lakes-funding/

Lindsey Bacigal

We the People of Detroit – Healing Our Waters-Great Lakes Coalition

Contact: Jordan Lubetkin, Healing Our Waters-Great Lakes Coalition, lubetkin@nwf.org, (734) 904-1589

Groups Support Biden Administration Efforts to Combat Toxic Lead, Protect Health of Communities

DETROIT, MICH. (December 20, 2021)—We the People of Detroit and the Healing Our Waters-Great Lakes Coalition are supporting the Biden Administration’s efforts to combat lead poisoning in communities. The administration released a plan late last week to accelerate the removal of toxic lead in water pipes that can harm families—especially children. It is estimated that more than 10 million people in in rural and urban communities in the United States are at risk for lead poisoning due to lead service lines.

“We applaud the efforts of the Biden Administration to confront this serious threat to our communities,” said Monica Lewis Patrick, president of We the People of Detroit. “The millions of people who are at risk for lead poisoning need help and relief to protect themselves and their families. We are glad to see President Biden and Vice President Harris taking the bull by the horns and taking action to help the people most impacted by this insidious pollution.”

The plight of residents in Flint, Mich., and more recently in Benton Harbor, Mich., who have not been able to safely drink their water due to lead poisoning, have shed a light on the national problem of lead-tainted pipes in millions of homes across the nation—many of them in older Midwestern cities like Detroit, Cleveland, Buffalo, Milwaukee and Chicago. Lead poisoning afflicts rural communities as well.

The Biden Administration has been a vocal supporter of increased efforts to address lead contamination, and federal funding to remove and replace lead pipes has been substantially increased through investments in the bipartisan infrastructure bill, the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act.

“Clean water is a basic need, but right now too many communities in the United States are dealing with health-threatening pollution,” said Laura Rubin, director of the Healing Our Waters-Great Lakes Coalition. “We need to do all we can to ensure that every person has access to safe, clean and affordable water and are glad that the Biden Administration and U.S. Congress are ratcheting up investments to protect our communities from lead poisoning. As lead-abatement programs move forward, we need to ensure that funds are being targeted to the biggest problems and the people most in need. These investments will protect community health, safeguard our drinking water, and put local people to work.”

The Biden Administration has stated it will work to target government investment to help communities most impacted by pollution. Data from the EPA says some communities—especially low-income, Black, Latino, and Indigenous communities—are more likely to be dealing with serious health threats from pollution.

We the People of Detroit and the Healing Our Waters-Great Lakes support efforts to ensure that the communities that have been harmed the most by pollution are prioritized when it comes to cleanup, and that the people who live in those communities have a voice in the solutions.

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The post Groups Support Biden Administration Efforts to Combat Toxic Lead, Protect Health of Communities appeared first on Healing Our Waters Coalition.

Original Article

Healing Our Waters Coalition

Healing Our Waters Coalition

https://healthylakes.org/groups-support-biden-administration-efforts-to-combat-toxic-lead-protect-health-of-communities/

Lindsey Bacigal

CONTACT:
Lindsey Bacigal, BacigalL@nwf.org, (734) 887-7113  
Jordan Lubetkin, Lubetkin@nwf.org, (734) 904-1589  

ANN ARBOR, MICH. (DECEMBER 16, 2021)—The Healing Our Waters-Great Lakes Coalition and 63 of its members are urging the Biden Administration to fully fund Great Lakes restoration efforts that clean up toxic pollution, restore wildlife habitat, reduce runoff pollution, and fight invasive species. In a letter sent yesterday to the director the Office of Management and Budget, the Coalition is urging the Biden Administration to request $400 million for the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative in the president’s annual budget, expected in February. Read the letter on our website. 

“Federal investments to restore and protect the Great Lakes have been producing results in communities across the region,” said Laura Rubin, director of the Healing Our Waters-Great Lakes Coalition. “However, urgent problems remain, and much work still needs to be done to ensure that everyone in the region has access to safe, clean, and affordable drinking water. We hope that the Biden Administration shows its support for the Great Lakes and our drinking water by fully funding this important program.”  

The Great Lakes Restoration Initiative has supported more than 6,000 projects in the eight-state region of Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin in support of clean drinking water, heathy communities, and recreational opportunities. These efforts are helping communities clean up toxic pollution to protect the health of people, reduce farm runoff to safeguard drinking water, and restore fish and wildlife habitat to support outdoor recreation. 

“The Great Lakes still face urgent problems, and much work needs to be done,” the Coalition writes in its letter to OMB. “Dwindling habitat, invasive species, and toxic pollutants threaten the region, endangering human and wildlife health, lowering property values, and hurting the region’s economy. Moreover, emerging contaminants and a changing climate continue to exacerbate the challenges we face, many of which disproportionately impact people that have historically borne the brunt of environmental injustice. Allowing these problems to get worse will only put our communities at risk and make them more expensive to solve.” 

Since 2004, the Healing Our Waters-Great Lakes Coalition has been harnessing the collective power of more than 170 groups representing millions of people, whose common goal is to restore and protect the Great Lakes. Learn more at HealthyLakes.org or follow us on Twitter @HealthyLakes.    

### 

The post Coalition Urges Biden Administration to Support Great Lakes in 2023 Budget Request   appeared first on Healing Our Waters Coalition.

Original Article

Healing Our Waters Coalition

Healing Our Waters Coalition

https://healthylakes.org/coalition-urges-biden-administration-to-support-great-lakes-in-2023-budget-request/

Lindsey Bacigal

On Monday, November 15, President Biden signed into law a sweeping bipartisan infrastructure package, the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act (IIJA), paving the way for historic investments in drinking water and wastewater infrastructure, Great Lakes restoration, and core clean water priorities. This historic legislation is a big step forward in addressing the water infrastructure crisis threatening our communities and accelerating the restoration of the Great Lakes. But what are these investments and how can they help communities most impacted by pollution? 

What can this mean for the region?  

The new law has the potential to be transformative for the 8-state Great Lakes region (Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Wisconsin, and New York) and the nation, potentially investing over $1.2 trillion in a broad range of infrastructure priorities from roads and bridges to broadband and water infrastructure. Some of the key topline investments with the potential to aid our states and communities in making progress on clean water and environmental restoration priorities include: 

  • $1 billion in supplemental funding for the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative (GLRI) over 5 years 
  • $50 billion in clean water and drinking water infrastructure through key Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) programs, including: 
    • $11.7 billion for both the Clean Water and Drinking Water State Revolving Fund (CWSRF & DWSRF) programs 
    • $15 billion for lead service line replacement through the Drinking Water SRF program 
    • $10 billion to address emerging contaminants through the Small and Disadvantaged Communities program, the Drinking Water SRF, and the Clean Water SRF 
  • Billions in potential additional funding for existing and new water infrastructure programs over the next 5 years with up to: 
    • $22.8 billion for the Clean Water SRF 
    • $20 billion for the Drinking Water SRF 
    • $1.4 billion for EPA’s Sec. 221 Sewer Overflow grant program 
    • $700 million for EPA’s Reducing Lead in Drinking Water and Lead in Schools programs 
    • $250 million for a new EPA Individual Decentralized Wastewater Treatment System grant program 

Why is this important and how does this help my community? 

Our communities have been grappling with crumbling and unsafe drinking water and wastewater infrastructure for decades. At minimum, it is estimated that the Great Lakes region needs a staggering $188 billion over the next 20 years to improve, upgrade, and repair systems, showcasing the need for a transformational federal commitment in this critical infrastructure. This work has also become increasingly unaffordable for communities and residents, as the federal contribution to water infrastructure declined precipitously over the last four decades, falling from 63 percent of water infrastructure spending in the 1970s to 9 percent today. This new package will nearly double traditional federal contributions to the SRF program over the next 5 years with a further $25 billion in targeted investments to address lead service line replacement and emerging contaminants. 

How do these funds help the communities most in need? 

Despite this significant investment, far too often the costs of repairing and replacing critical water infrastructure are being passed on to those who can least afford it. A lack of investment that has disproportionately impacted communities that have historically borne the brunt of pollution and now are faced with water utility bills that have doubled or tripled over the last decade. How does this increased investment begin to address some of the existing financial barriers to entry for investing in the most underserved communities?

Despite this significant investment, far too often the costs of repairing and replacing critical water infrastructure are being passed on to those who can least afford it. A lack of investment that has disproportionately impacted communities that have historically borne the brunt of pollution and now are faced with water utility bills that have doubled or tripled over the last decade.3 How does this increased investment begin to address some of the existing financial barriers to entry for investing in the most underserved communities?  

This legislation will require that half of the funds provided for the SRF program be used to provide 100% principal forgiveness or be distributed as grants, a significant increase over the previously capped level of permitted subsidy in the program. Moreover, the $25 billion in targeted funds for lead service line replacement and emerging contaminants is mandated to be fully distributed as loans with 100% principal forgiveness or as grants. This subsidization can dramatically reduce the cost burden of repairing or replacing failing infrastructure for many of communities in the region. 

It is important, though, to be clear that this is only a start. Much of the challenge of equitable implementation will fall on the state, which will receive most of these funds to distribute through existing systems. These systems are often a challenge for many small or low-income communities and utilities to navigate. Moving forward, it is essential to continue to engage the federal-state-local partnership to enhance public engagement, invest in technical assistance, and make sure our most vulnerable communities are centered in this implementation process.

How much money will flow to my state? 

With billions expected to flow through new and existing programs, federal and state agencies are rushing to prepare to administer these investments over the next 5 years. For state administered SRF programs, this could mean preparing for millions in additional funding, which can have significant impacts for communities. 

While we don’t have exact figures, projecting out funding for non-targeted SRF funds consistent with previous year allocations, we can theorize that the Great Lakes states could see the following increases in the federal contribution to their respective CWSRF and DWSRF programs. The “Minimum IIJA Investment as Enacted” reflects what is expected to flow to each state from the funds directly provided by the bill upon signing, but the “Maximum IIJA Investment” reflects the potential maximum if Congress supports the amounts authorized to be appropriated in addition to the initial funding in future years: 

(All figures are approximate and do not include state match or other contributions) 

What’s next? 

This historic victory is a leap forward in investing in the communities of the region and in the Great Lakesthemselves, but it is only the first step in the process. More work is needed to empower communities to invest these funds where they are most needed and ensure that all have access to safe, clean water. 

Moreover, in Congress the job is not done. The passage of the IIJA begins to address our regional water infrastructure crisis. But these issues cannot be addressed in the longterm without acting on the climate crisis. Climate change threatens communities as more intense storms lead to more flooding, overwhelming sewer systems, contaminating drinking water sources, and pushing current infrastructure past its limits. The good news is that there is an immediate opportunity to build on the passage of the IIJA by taking long-overdue action on climate change through the Build Back Better Act. In the coming days and weeks, we will see the House and the Senate continue consideration of this package, which could result in over $550 billion in climate investments to help the nation transition to a more sustainable future while helping communities adapt and become more resilient to the impacts of a warming climate. The Healing Our Waters-Great Lakes Coalition urges our Great Lakes delegation to work together to quickly reach a final agreement as the failure to address climate change will only make existing problems worse and limit the long-term impact of this historic infrastructure victory. 

The post What Does the Infrastructure Act Mean for the Great Lakes Region? appeared first on Healing Our Waters Coalition.

Original Article

Healing Our Waters Coalition

Healing Our Waters Coalition

https://healthylakes.org/what-does-the-infrastructure-act-mean-for-the-great-lakes-region/

Lindsey Bacigal

CONTACT:
Lindsey Bacigal, BacigalL@nwf.org, (734) 887-7113
Jordan Lubetkin, Lubetkin@nwf.org, (734) 904-1589 

ANN ARBOR, MICH. (November 19, 2021)—The U.S. House passed sweeping legislation this morning to help communities prepare for, and adapt to, climate change and restore clean water. The Healing Our Waters-Great Lakes Coalition is heralding many of the investments in the Build Back Better Act, which contains the largest federal investment in the nation’s history to confront the climate crisis. The package will now move to the Senate, which is expected to take up the reconciliation process as early as December 1. 

“We applaud the House for taking action. Climate change is here. It is impacting the Great Lakes. It is harming our communities. And it is only going to get worse, if we wait any longer to act,” said Laura Rubin, director of the Healing Our Waters-Great Lakes Coalition. “The extreme weather, more frequent and severe flooding, and erosion being driven by climate change is straining the region’s inadequate water infrastructure, harming communities, hurting the economy, and jeopardizing the health of people.”  

The Build Back Better Act contains over $550 billion in climate investments to get us to a clean energy future, while helping communities adapt, including: 

  • $6 billion in investments for the conservation, restoration, and protection of our coastal habitats and enhancing the resilience of our coastal communities threatened by climate change. 
  • $10 billion to address the threat of lead in drinking water: 
    • $9 billion for disadvantaged communities and schools. 
    • $970 million for lead remediation in rural communities. 
  • $1.85 billion to address sewer overflows. 
  • $225 million for water assistance programs. 
  • $150 million for individual household decentralized wastewater treatment systems. 
  • Over $27 billion for agriculture programs including farmland conservation, regenerative agriculture, and climate research. 
  • $3 billion for environmental and climate justice block grants. 

Climate change is exacerbating many threats to the Great Lakes and communities, including polluted runoff that causes toxic algal blooms, sewage overflows that close beaches, and flooding that jeopardizes homes, businesses, and communities. 

We encourage the Senate to act swiftly on legislation that confronts the climate crisis and provides the tools and resources communities so desperately need to protect themselves from the devastating economic, environmental and public health impacts of climate change. 

Since 2004, the Healing Our Waters-Great Lakes Coalition has been harnessing the collective power of more than 170 groups representing millions of people, whose common goal is to restore and protect the Great Lakes. Learn more at HealthyLakes.org or follow us on Twitter @HealthyLakes. 

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The post Coalition Applauds House Action on Climate, Urges Senate Action to Protect Great Lakes, Communities   appeared first on Healing Our Waters Coalition.

Original Article

Healing Our Waters Coalition

Healing Our Waters Coalition

https://healthylakes.org/coalition-applauds-house-action-on-climate-urges-senate-action-to-protect-great-lakes-communities/

Lindsey Bacigal

CONTACT:
Lindsey Bacigal, BacigalL@nwf.org, (734) 887-7113
Jordan Lubetkin, Lubetkin@nwf.org, (734) 904-1589

Ann Arbor, Mich. (November 15, 2021)—President Joe Biden signed the bipartisan infrastructure bill today, paving the way for historic investments in drinking water and sewage treatment infrastructure, Great Lakes restoration, and core clean water priorities. The Healing Our Waters-Great Lakes Coalition is heralding the bill as a tremendous victory for people and communities.

“The bipartisan infrastructure bill is a victory for the Great Lakes and the millions of people who depend on them for their drinking water, health, jobs, and quality of life,” said Laura Rubin, director of the Healing Our Waters-Great Lakes Coalition. “This bill is a big step forward in addressing the water infrastructure crisis threatening our communities and will provide much-needed help to the people who have been most impacted by pollution. We thank President Joe Biden and members of Congress for working together to make infrastructure and clean water a national priority.”

The Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act will invest $1.2 trillion in the nation’s infrastructure, including $50 billion for drinking water and wastewater infrastructure. Investing in water infrastructure protects public health and improves climate resiliency of our communities, reducing maintenance and operational costs, and creating good-paying local jobs. The act also contains $1 billion to clean up toxic pollution, restore fish and wildlife habitat, reduce farm and city runoff pollution, and confront invasive species through the federal Great Lakes Restoration Initiative.

The Great Lakes states of Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin, according to the EPA, need more than $188 billion over 20 years to update their drinking water and wastewater infrastructure. (This chart contains the water infrastructure needs of each state.)

Since 2004, the Healing Our Waters-Great Lakes Coalition has been harnessing the collective power of more than 170 groups representing millions of people, whose common goal is to restore and protect the Great Lakes. Learn more at HealthyLakes.org or follow us on Twitter @HealthyLakes.

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The post Biden Signs Bipartisan Infrastructure Bill, Boon for Great Lakes, Clean Water appeared first on Healing Our Waters Coalition.

Original Article

Healing Our Waters Coalition

Healing Our Waters Coalition

https://healthylakes.org/biden-signs-bipartisan-infrastructure-bill-boon-for-great-lakes-clean-water/

Lindsey Bacigal

CONTACT:
Jordan Lubetkin, LubetkinJ@nwf.org, (734) 904-1589
Lindsey Bacigal, BacigalL@nwf.org, (734) 887-7113

Coalition: ‘We hope that today’s vote to bolster our nation’s water infrastructure provides momentum for taking action on climate change.’

Ann Arbor, Mich. (November 6, 2021)—The U.S. House passed a bipartisan infrastructure package last night in a 228 to 206 vote that boosts federal investment in core Great Lakes and clean water programs, including significant investments in water infrastructure and $1 billion in additional funding for the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative. The bill, the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act, passed the U.S. Senate in August by a 69-30 bipartisan vote. The Healing Our Waters-Great Lakes Coalition encouraged federal lawmakers to use its passage as momentum to act on climate change.

“The bipartisan infrastructure bill is a victory for the Great Lakes and the millions of people who depend on them for their drinking water, health, jobs, and quality of life,” said Laura Rubin, director of the Healing Our Waters-Great Lakes Coalition. “This bill is a big step forward in addressing the water infrastructure crisis threatening our communities. We’ve seen the positive impact that federal investments in the Great Lakes and clean water have had on the region. These infrastructure investments will allow for this important work to continue and provide much-needed help to the communities that have been most impacted by pollution. We thank members of Congress for supporting this vital bill and urge President Biden to sign it into law.”

The Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act now heads to President Joe Biden. Once signed into law, the bill will invest $1.2 trillion for infrastructure work, including authorizing $35 billion in water infrastructure investments over five years, supplemented by over $62 billion in additional appropriations to augment critical infrastructure programs and address public health threats.

The investments in the bill will help address the water infrastructure crisis in the region and across the country. The Great Lakes states of Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin, according to the EPA, need more than $188 billion over 20 years to update their drinking water and wastewater infrastructure. (This chart contains the water infrastructure needs of each state.)

This Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act will address:

  • aging and crumbling drinking water and wastewater infrastructure (with over $70 billion in federal investments);
  • replacement of harmful lead service lines ($15 billion); and,
  • action on emerging contaminants like toxic PFAS ($10 billion).

The act also advances ecosystem restoration efforts, improving the resilience of our communities and protecting our waters through:

  • $1 billion in supplemental funding for the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative to restore habitat, clean up toxic pollution, reduce runoff pollution, and manage invasive species; and,
  • $1.9 billion in supplemental funding for U.S. Army Corps of Engineers aquatic restoration projects, some of which can potentially fund projects to protect and restore Great Lakes coastal habitats and fisheries.

This funding is a significant step forward in protecting communities throughout the Great Lakes region, and the bill contains many priorities of the Healing Our Waters-Great Lakes Coalition.

The Coalition is also urging Congress to use the passage of the bipartisan Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act as a catalyst to take significant action to address the climate crisis and to boost investments that help communities prepare for, and respond to, impacts due to climate change – so-called climate resilience –as currently being considered under the Build Back Better framework.

The extreme weather, more frequent and severe flooding, and erosion being driven by climate change is straining the region’s and nation’s inadequate water infrastructure, harming communities, hurting the economy, and jeopardizing the health of people.

“Confronting the climate crisis goes hand in hand with protecting and restoring the Great Lakes,” said Rubin. “We hope that today’s vote to bolster our nation’s water infrastructure provides momentum for taking action on climate change. We urge Congress to quickly reach agreement on legislation that confronts the climate crisis and provide the tools and resources communities so desperately need to protect themselves from the devastating economic, environmental and public health impacts of climate change. We have solutions, and it is time to use them before the problems get worse and more costly.”

Since 2004, the Healing Our Waters-Great Lakes Coalition has been harnessing the collective power of more than 170 groups representing millions of people, whose common goal is to restore and protect the Great Lakes. Learn more at HealthyLakes.org or follow us on Twitter @HealthyLakes.

The post Coalition Applauds Passage of House Bill with Billions for Water Infrastructure, $1B for Great Lakes Restoration appeared first on Healing Our Waters Coalition.

Original Article

Healing Our Waters Coalition

Healing Our Waters Coalition

https://healthylakes.org/coalition-applauds-passage-of-house-bill-with-billions-for-water-infrastructure-1b-for-great-lakes-restoration/

Lindsey Bacigal

NY says no to voting reforms, yes to environmental right

By Marina Villeneuve, Associated Press

ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) — New Yorkers approved a ballot measure adding the right to a clean environment to the state constitution but rejected other proposed amendments that could have made it easier to vote.

The environmental measure was one of five statewide ballot questions before New York voters Tuesday.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2021/11/ap-ny-voting-reforms-environmental-right/

The Associated Press

Senators urge emergency protections for wolves in US West

By Matthew Brown, Associated Press

BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — A group of Democratic lawmakers on Thursday urged the Biden administration to enact emergency protections for gray wolves in the U.S. West in response to Republican-backed state laws that make it easier to kill the predators.

Twenty-one U.S.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2021/11/ap-senators-emergency-protections-wolves/

The Associated Press

US Democratic governors to participate in U.N. climate talks

By Kathleen Ronayne, Associated Press

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — U.S. governors want a seat at the table as international leaders prepare to gather in Scotland at a critical moment for global efforts to reduce fossil fuel emissions and slow the planet’s temperature rise.

At least a half dozen state governors — all Democrats — plan to attend parts of the two-week United Nations’ climate change conference in Glasgow, known as COP26.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2021/11/ap-democratic-governors-climate-talks/

The Associated Press

Billions in environmental justice funds hang in the balance

By Drew Costley, AP Science Writer

Tens of billions of dollars for U.S. environmental justice initiatives originally proposed in a $3.5 trillion domestic spending package now hang in the balance as Democrats decide how to trim the bill down to $2 trillion.

Investments in a wide range of these projects were proposed in the Build Back Better plan, but Senators Joe Manchin of West Virginia and Kyrsten Sinema of Arizona demanded that the bill be reduced, with Manchin asking for it to be cut by as much as half.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2021/10/ap-environmental-justice-funds-balance/

The Associated Press

COP26 Coverage: What do you want to know about the U.N. climate change conference?

Climate change is one of the more pressing topics that Great Lakes Now has its eye on. Come Oct. 31, one of the largest global conferences will be convening to discuss that topic, so Great Lakes Now will be right there to help keep you up to date.

COP26 is the next annual UN climate change conference.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

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https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2021/10/cop26-questions-un-climate-change-conference/

Natasha Blakely

U.S. Senate Funding Bills Boost Clean Water, Great Lakes Investments
Federal interior and environment bill contains $350 million for Great Lakes restoration, $3.3 billion for water infrastructure.

ANN ARBOR, MICH. (October 19, 2021)—The U.S. Senate released its nine remaining funding bills yesterday that boost federal investments to restore the Great Lakes, remove toxic lead from drinking water, confront sewage overflows, and reduce farm and city runoff pollution. The interior and environment spending bill contains $350 million for the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative and more than $3.3 billion to upgrade drinking water and sewage infrastructure. The boost in clean water priorities is more than was allocated in last year’s federal budget, although less than bills backed by the U.S. House.

“We are glad to see the U.S. Senate boost funding for essential clean water programs that people depend on for their drinking water, health, and quality of life,” said Laura Rubin, director of the Healing Our Waters-Great Lakes Coalition. “Federal investments are producing results in local communities, although we know serious threats remain. We encourage House and Senate leaders, as well as the Biden Administration, to use all of the tools at their disposal to fully fund restoration efforts and to ensure every person in this country has access to clean, safe, and affordable water. This includes robust federal investments to protect the health of people and communities, as well as policy solutions that prevent pollution and further harm. Further, as climate change continues to exacerbate many threats – from sewage overflows to toxic algal blooms to flooding in neighborhoods – we encourage elected officials to act with urgency, purpose, and ambition so that we meet this moment with solutions that are commensurate to the threats at hand. Delay will make the problems worse and more expensive to solve.”

The release of the Senate funding bills comes as members of Congress discuss the fate of a $1 trillion infrastructure investment package and additional legislation to fund federal safety net and climate change programs. The Senate bills released yesterday will fund the U.S. government for fiscal year 2022, which goes from October 1, 2021 through September 30, 2022. The next step of the process is for House and Senate negotiators to reach consensus on a final federal budget before a temporary budget deal expires in December.

The Senate proposal to fund the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative at $350 million is $10 million above the Biden Administration’s budget request, but $25 million below the authorized levels of the program supported by the House. The Senate spending bill includes the following key programs:

  • Great Lakes Protection and Restoration
    • Great Lakes Restoration Initiative: $350 million – a $20 million increase over fiscal year 2021.
    • Invasive Carp funding: $36 million across U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and U.S. Geological Survey programs – a $0.4 million increase over fiscal year 2021.
  • Water Infrastructure
    • Over $3.3 billion for Clean Water and Drinking Water Infrastructure programs.
      • Clean Water State Revolving Fund: $1.69 billion – a $50 million increase over fiscal year 2021.
      • Drinking Water State Revolving Fund: $1.18 billion – a $50 million increase over fiscal year 2021.
      • An additional $439 million for Water and Wastewater Infrastructure grants is provided for Congressionally Directed Spending.
    • Sewer Overflow Grants: $56 million – a $16 million increase over fiscal year 2021.
    • Reducing Lead in Drinking Water: $72 million – a $50.5 million increase over fiscal year 2021.
  • Clean Water Protection
    • Clean water state grants: $235 million – a $5 million increase over fiscal year 2021.
    • Nonpoint pollution grants: $180 million – a $3 million increase over fiscal year 2021.

 

Since 2004, the Healing Our Waters-Great Lakes Coalition has been harnessing the collective power of more than 170 groups representing millions of people, whose common goal is to restore and protect the Great Lakes. Learn more at HealthyLakes.org or follow us on Twitter @HealthyLakes.

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Lindsey Bacigal

EPA unveils strategy to regulate toxic ‘forever chemicals’

By Matthew Daly, Associated Press

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Biden administration is launching a broad strategy to regulate toxic industrial compounds associated with serious health conditions that are used in products ranging from cookware to carpets and firefighting foams.

Michael Regan, the head of the Environmental Protection Agency, said it is taking a series of actions to limit pollution from a cluster of long-lasting chemicals known as PFAS that are increasingly turning up in public drinking water systems, private wells and even food.

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https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2021/10/ap-epa-strategy-regulate-pfas/

The Associated Press

PFAS News Roundup: Michigan works on transparency, 3M could cost the Minnesota public billions, study recruitment in Michigan

PFAS, short for per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances, are a group of widespread man-made chemicals that don’t break down in the environment or the human body and have been flagged as a major contaminant in sources of water across the country.

Keep up with PFAS-related developments in the Great Lakes area.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2021/10/pfas-study-michigan-wisconsin-minnesota-billions-transparency/

Natasha Blakely

Will taxpayers bear the cost of cleaning up America’s abandoned oil wells?

By Leanna First-Arai, The Guardian

This story originally appeared in The Guardian and is republished here as part of Covering Climate Now, a global journalism collaboration strengthening coverage of the climate story.

 

Oil and gas companies have a century-old bad habit of drilling wells and ditching them.

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Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2021/10/taxpayers-cost-cleaning-americas-abandoned-oil-wells/

The Guardian

HOW Coalition - Support Comprehensive Infrastructuere Legislation (9.29.21) (002)

The post HOW Letter to Representatives: Support Comprehensive Infrastructure Legislation appeared first on Healing Our Waters Coalition.

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https://healthylakes.org/how-letter-to-representatives-support-comprehensive-infrastructure-legislation/

Lindsey Bacigal

6 tribes sue Wisconsin to try to stop November wolf hunt

Six Native American tribes sued Wisconsin on Tuesday to try to stop its planned gray wolf hunt in November, asserting that the hunt violates their treaty rights and endangers an animal they consider sacred.

The Chippewa tribes say treaties give them rights to half of the wolf quota in territory they ceded to the United States in the mid-1800s.

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https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2021/09/ap-6-tribes-sue-wisconsin-november-wolf-hunt/

The Associated Press

US: Wolves may need protections after states expand hunting

BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — The Biden administration said Wednesday that federal protections may need to be restored for gray wolves in the western U.S. after Republican-backed state laws made it much easier to kill the predators.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service initial determination that the region’s wolves could again be in peril — after decades spent restoring them — will kick off a year-long biological review.

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https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2021/09/ap-wolves-protections-states-expand-hunting/

The Associated Press

Adaptation vs. Mitigation: Canada’s national climate change adaptation strategy needs balance

Amid wildfires, heat waves, drought and catastrophic flooding, Canada is moving ahead with its first ever national adaptation strategy to help Canadians identify and deliver on meaningful ways of adapting to the worsening effects of the climate emergency.

First announced in December 2020 and updated in mid-August, the government aims to consult widely with Indigenous groups, youth and environmental organizations to create a framework for concrete actions that businesses, governments and individuals can take to ensure the resilience of their communities.

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https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2021/09/adaptation-mitigation-canada-national-climate-change-strategy/

Andrew Reeves

Illinois Senate passes energy deal governor says falls short

CHICAGO (AP) — A massive energy policy overhaul aimed at making Illinois a fully renewable-energy state by 2050 cleared the Senate early Wednesday despite objections from Gov. J.B. Pritzker and groups who want more environmental and consumer protections.

Negotiations have been ongoing for years on the deal that includes a generous bailout for nuclear plants, closing coal-fired plants, investments in wind and solar energy and ethics measures in the wake of a utility scandal.

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https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2021/09/ap-illinois-senate-energy-deal-governor-falls-short/

The Associated Press

Ann Arbor, Mich. (August 31, 2021) —The Healing Our Waters-Great Lakes Coalition is pleased to see the Trump Administration’s Navigable Waters Protection Rule vacated by the U.S. District Court for the District of Arizona because the rule causes environmental harm. Restoring protections for streams and wetlands has been a priority of the Coalition.

“This decision is a victory for millions of people who depend on streams and wetlands for their drinking water and their health,” said Laura Rubin, director of the Healing Our Waters-Great Lakes Coalition. “With so many of our cities and towns living with unsafe drinking water, we need more – not less – protections for clean water. We look forward to working with the Biden Administration to put in place solid clean water protections to protect our drinking water, public health, and Great Lakes.”

The ruling comes as the result of a lawsuit by six federally recognized Indigenous tribes (Pascua Yaqui Tribe, Tohono O’odham Nation, Quinault Indian Nation, Menominee Indian Tribe of Wisconsin, Fond du Lac Band of Lake Superior Chippewa, and the Bad River Band of Lake Superior Chippewa) represented by Earthjustice, who sued the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers for passing a rule that eliminated Clean Water Act protections for thousands of miles of streams and wetlands.

The Navigable Waters Protection Rule was a significant step backward for the health of the Great Lakes region’s waterways. The Trump Administration’s interpretation of the Clean Water Act ignored the overwhelming scientific evidence of the connectivity of waterways that we all rely on; discounted the negative impacts of unregulated pollution in ephemeral and intermittent streams; disregarded the importance of wetlands; and placed our drinking water and the waters that drive our economy at great risk.

The Coalition now urges the Biden Administration to move ahead immediately to restore and implement the regulatory definition in effect prior to the Navigable Waters Protection Rule and begin the rulemaking process on its replacement by the end of the year.

Since 2004, the Healing Our Waters-Great Lakes Coalition has been harnessing the collective power of more than 170 groups representing millions of people, whose common goal is to restore and protect the Great Lakes. Learn more at HealthyLakes.org or follow us on Twitter @HealthyLakes.

###

CONTACT:
Jordan Lubetkin, LubetkinJ@nwf.org, (734) 904-1589
Lindsey Bacigal, BacigalL@nwf.org, (734) 887-7113

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Lindsey Bacigal

Michigan Democratic lawmakers propose $5 billion plan to deal with climate change-caused flooding

By Lester Graham, Michigan Radio

The Great Lakes News Collaborative includes Bridge Michigan; Circle of Blue; Great Lakes Now at Detroit Public Television; and Michigan Radio, Michigan’s NPR News Leader; who work together to bring audiences news and information about the impact of climate change, pollution, and aging infrastructure on the Great Lakes and drinking water.

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Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2021/08/michigan-lawmakers-plan-climate-change-flooding/

Michigan Radio

PFAS News Roundup: Tech company develops PFAS-eliminating technology, PFAS Action Act heads to Senate, study finds PFAS in Arctic ice

PFAS, short for per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances, are a group of widespread man-made chemicals that don’t break down in the environment or the human body and have been flagged as a major contaminant in sources of water across the country.

Keep up with PFAS-related developments in the Great Lakes area.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2021/08/pfas-action-act-senate-study-arctic-ice/

Rachel Duckett

EXCLUSIVE: Biden mileage rule to exceed Obama climate goal

WASHINGTON (AP) — In a major step against climate change, President Joe Biden is proposing a return to aggressive Obama-era vehicle mileage standards over five years, according to industry and government officials briefed on the plan. He’s then aiming for even tougher anti-pollution rules after that to forcefully reduce greenhouse gas emissions and nudge 40% of U.S.

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Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2021/07/ap-biden-mileage-rule-obama-climate-goal/

The Associated Press

PFAS News Roundup: EPA approved PFAS use for fracking, $20M for Ontario airport cleanup, PFAS Action Act set for House vote

PFAS, short for per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances, are a group of widespread man-made chemicals that don’t break down in the environment or the human body and have been flagged as a major contaminant in sources of water across the country.

Keep up with PFAS-related developments in the Great Lakes area.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2021/07/pfas-epa-fracking-ontario-cleanup-action-act-house/

Noah Bock

Drinking Water Roundup: Biden administration invests millions in rural water, treatment plant uses ultraviolet, lead pipe removal in Flint

From lead pipes to PFAS, drinking water contamination is a major issue plaguing cities and towns all around the Great Lakes. Cleaning up contaminants and providing safe water to everyone is an ongoing public health struggle.

Keep up with drinking water-related developments in the Great Lakes area.

Click on the headline to read the full story:

Illinois:

  • Discolored water, manganese in Carlinville a recurring problem – WICS

SPRINGFIELD, Ill., (WICS) — High levels of Manganese in the city of Carlinville’s water is causing the water to turn brown, stain clothes, and more.

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Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2021/07/drinking-water-biden-rural-infrastructure-lead-pipe/

Rachel Duckett

Energy News Roundup: US invests in wave energy, Celebrities urge Biden to stop Line 3, Company seeks damages for Keystone XL cancellation

Keep up with energy-related developments in the Great Lakes area with Great Lakes Now’s biweekly headline roundup.

Click on the headline to read the full story:

Illinois:

  • Illinois coal plants are closing even as fossil fuel objections stall energy bill again – Energy News Network

In a surprise announcement last Thursday, NRG said it would close its Waukegan and Romeoville coal plants, but the community impacts are unclear as “just transition” provisions remain held up in state energy bill negotiations.

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Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2021/07/energy-investments-biden-line-3-keystone-xl-cancellation/

Noah Bock

Canada expands ballast water restrictions to reduce invasive species spread

By Lester Graham, Michigan Radio

The Great Lakes News Collaborative includes Bridge Michigan; Circle of Blue; Great Lakes Now at Detroit Public Television; and Michigan Radio, Michigan’s NPR News Leader; who work together to bring audiences news and information about the impact of climate change, pollution, and aging infrastructure on the Great Lakes and drinking water.

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Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2021/06/canada-ballast-water-restrictions-invasive-species/

Michigan Radio

In break with Trump, House GOP forms group on climate change

WASHINGTON (AP) — Utah Rep. John Curtis says he’s tired of hearing that Republicans — his party colleagues — don’t care about climate change or slowing global warming.

A former Provo mayor who has served in Congress since 2017, Curtis says Republicans can push for serious climate solutions while holding fast to conservative values.

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Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2021/06/ap-house-gop-group-climate-change/

The Associated Press

Army Corps plans extensive review of Great Lakes tunnel plan

TRAVERSE CITY, Mich. (AP) — The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers said Wednesday it would conduct an extensive review of Enbridge Energy’s plan to build an oil pipeline tunnel beneath a Great Lakes channel in Michigan, which could significantly delay the project.

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Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2021/06/ap-army-corps-extensive-review-line-5-tunnel/

The Associated Press

PFAS News Roundup: Companies hid dangers from FDA, professor documents stories, study shows high levels in fertilizer

PFAS, short for per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances, are a group of widespread man-made chemicals that don’t break down in the environment or the human body and have been flagged as a major contaminant in sources of water across the country. 

Keep up with PFAS-related developments in the Great Lakes area. 

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2021/06/pfas-news-professor-stories-study-high-levels-fertilizer/

Noah Bock

EPA restoring state and tribal power to protect waterways

WASHINGTON (AP) — In the latest reversal of a Trump-era policy, the Biden administration’s Environmental Protection Agency is restoring a rule that grants states and Native American tribes authority to block pipelines and other energy projects that can pollute rivers, streams and other waterways.

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Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2021/05/ap-epa-state-tribal-power-protect-waterways/

The Associated Press

Water Access: As moratoria on shutoffs end, old problems return to the forefront

As moratoria expire across the Great Lakes region, advocates say ongoing affordability and debt relief are key.

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Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2021/04/water-shutoffs-debt-infrastructure/

Kari Lydersen

A big fight in Lansing over fishing rules on the Great Lakes

By Kelly House, Bridge Michigan, through the Institute for Nonprofit News network.

The Great Lakes News Collaborative includes Bridge Michigan; Circle of Blue; Great Lakes Now at Detroit Public Television; and Michigan Radio, Michigan’s NPR News Leader; who work together to bring audiences news and information about the impact of climate change, pollution, and aging infrastructure on the Great Lakes and drinking water.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2021/04/michigan-fishing-rules-dnr-great-lakes/

Bridge Michigan

The problem within: Biden targets lead pipes, pushes equity

CHICAGO (AP) — In the modest bungalows and two-flats of Chicago’s Little Village neighborhood, there’s never a shortage of needed home repairs staring residents in the face. And then there is the less obvious but more ominous problem lurking in their pipes.

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Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2021/04/the-problem-within-biden-targets-lead-pipes-pushes-equity/

The Associated Press

Spotlight on Infrastructure: Policy executive talks new Biden plan, definitions of infrastructure

While President Joe Biden’s infrastructure plan, officially the American Jobs Plan, emanates from the White House, a veteran Chicago policy executive says we should consider its genesis as broader than top down.

“It is something that cities and regions have requested – full partnership with the federal government – for quite some time,” said MarySue Barrett, president of the non-profit Metropolitan Planning Council.

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Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2021/04/infrastructure-biden-administration-policy-qna/

Gary Wilson

Controversial Indiana environmental bills inch near passage

INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — Lawmakers approved two environmental bills Tuesday that critics say could damage the state’s ecosystems by scaling back current policy affecting water, energy and other resources.

A measure seeking to remove protections from Indiana’s already diminished wetlands would eliminate a 2003 law that requires the Indiana Department of Environmental Management to issue permits in a state-regulated wetland and end enforcement proceedings against landowners allegedly violating current law.

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Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2021/04/ap-controversial-indiana-environmental-bills-near-passage/

The Associated Press

Wisconsin Supreme Court weighs state power to protect water from farm pollutants

This article, first posted here, was republished with permission from Wisconsin Watch.

By Royce Podeszwa and Jim Malewitz, Wisconsin Watch

The state Supreme Court on Monday heard arguments in a case that could determine whether the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources failed to adequately protect water from manure pollution when awarding a permit to a giant dairy farm in northeastern Wisconsin — or whether the agency lacks the authority to issue such restrictions.

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Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2021/04/wisconsin-supreme-court-protect-water-farm-pollutants/

Wisconsin Watch

Local Governments, Organizations Ask Indiana Legislators to Consider Alternatives to Bill Repealing State Wetland Protections

By Enrique Saenz, Indiana Environmental Reporter

More than 60 organizations, including local governments, environmental and conservation groups and water management agencies, sent a letter to Indiana state legislators, asking them to consider policy changes instead of supporting a bill seeking to remove all state protections for Indiana wetlands.

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Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2021/04/local-governments-environmental-organizations-indiana-legislators-state-wetland-protections/

Indiana Environmental Reporter

PFAS News Roundup: Michigan governor invokes defense bill, high levels in Minnesota landfills, business lobby sues Wisconsin DNR

PFAS, short for per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances, are a group of widespread man-made chemicals that don’t break down in the environment or the human body and have been flagged as a major contaminant in sources of water across the country.

Keep up with PFAS-related developments in the Great Lakes area.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2021/04/michigan-governor-minnesota-landfills-wisconsin-business-dnr/

Natasha Blakely

In Broad Strokes, Biden Infrastructure Plan Sketches a Future for Federal Water Spending

By Brett Walton, Circle of Blue

The Great Lakes News Collaborative includes Bridge Michigan; Circle of Blue; Great Lakes Now at Detroit Public Television; and Michigan Radio, Michigan’s NPR News Leader; who work together to bring audiences news and information about the impact of climate change, pollution, and aging infrastructure on the Great Lakes and drinking water.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2021/04/biden-infrastructure-plan-future-federal-water-spending/

Circle of Blue

H2Ohio: Agency directors focus on wetlands, farmer subsidies, replacing lead lines

The first full-year report for Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine’s much-publicized H2Ohio water quality initiative is out.

Introduced in 2019, the plan has already reaped benefits for Ohio residents and will continue to expand in its scope, according to officials charged with its implementation.

The report was offered in a web presentation by Ohio Department of Agriculture Director Dorothy Pelanda, Ohio Department of Natural Resources Director Mary Mertz and Ohio Environmental Protection Agency Director Laurie Stevenson.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2021/03/h2ohio-agency-directors-wetlands-lead-agriculture/

James Proffitt

Wisconsin Legislature moves to kill limits on PFAS, protect conversion therapy

By Todd Richmond, Associated Press Writer

MADISON, Wis. (AP) — The Wisconsin Legislature moved Tuesday to kill limits on PFAS pollution and to allow therapists, counselors and social workers to continue to try to change gay and transgender people’s sexual orientation.

The Senate and Assembly both took up a bill blocking a state Department of Safety and Professional Standards rule that would have prohibited so-called conversion therapy.

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Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2021/03/ap-wisconsin-legislature-moves-to-kill-limits-on-pfas-protect-conversion-therapy/

The Associated Press

Canada Speaks: In Enbridge Line 5 debate, Canadian representatives point to the impact on their economy

In the ongoing conflict over Line 5’s presence and future in Michigan, much of the debate has been between the Canadian energy company Enbridge, Inc. and the state of Michigan, or between Michigan environmentalists and Michigan businesses.

A recent joint committee session in the Michigan Senate heard from a third party: Canada.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2021/03/enbridge-line-5-debate-canadian-representatives-impact-economy/

Natasha Blakely

Air, Wind, Solar: In the Great Lakes region, energy stands out in President Biden’s efforts

If you have the good fortune to gaze at a Great Lake – any Great Lake – sometime in this strange year, you’re not likely to spot a glaring example of President Joseph R. Biden’s new emphasis on protecting the environment.

But that doesn’t mean they aren’t coming.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2021/03/air-wind-solar-great-lakes-energy-president-biden/

Dave Spratt

PFAS News Roundup: Indiana introduces PFAS bills, Michigan citizens unhappy about 8-month disclosure delay

PFAS, short for per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances, are a group of widespread man-made chemicals that don’t break down in the environment or the human body and have been flagged as a major contaminant in sources of water across the country.

Keep up with PFAS-related developments in the Great Lakes area.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2021/03/pfas-news-roundup-indiana-introduces-pfas-bills-michigan-citizens-unhappy-about-8-month-disclosure-delay/

Natasha Blakely

Too few farmers are curbing pollution in Lake Erie. Should they be forced?

As climate change complicates Lake Erie’s algae problem, scientists say farmers must do far more to reduce phosphorus runoff. But will enough farmers change their ways without a government mandate?

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2021/03/farmers-pollution-lake-erie-regulations/

Bridge Michigan