U.S. Army Corps directs millions to Great Lakes coastal resiliency, Soo Locks and invasive carp barrier

The project to construct a new Soo Lock has been fully funded as of Wednesday, when the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers released its Fiscal Year 2022 budget, which included $479 million directed to the new lock.

“In Michigan, we know how vital the Locks are to our economy and our national defense,” Sen.

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Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2022/01/army-corps-millions-great-lakes-coastal-resiliency-soo-locks-invasive-carp/

Natasha Blakely

Year in Review 2021: All creatures great (lakes) and small

A year ago, I wrote a year-end summary of our 2020 TV coverage that highlighted the obvious theme for that terrible year: poop. 

I ended that story with these words: “There will probably be more poop in the news in 2021, and if there is, we’ll bring it to you.

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Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2021/12/year-in-review-2021-creaturesl/

Rob Green

For the first time, “rock snot” nuisance algal blooms found in Lower Peninsula trout stream

By Lester Graham, Michigan Radio

The Great Lakes News Collaborative includes Bridge Michigan; Circle of Blue; Great Lakes Now at Detroit Public Television; and Michigan Radio, Michigan’s NPR News Leader; who work together to bring audiences news and information about the impact of climate change, pollution, and aging infrastructure on the Great Lakes and drinking water.

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Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2021/12/rock-snot-algal-blooms-lower-peninsula/

Michigan Radio

Grants are available to buy removal supplies, like sponges and towels, or host events teaching boaters how to properly clean off invasive species, according to a Department of Natural Resources press release.

The post Grant program repels Great Lakes invaders first appeared on Great Lakes Echo.

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Great Lakes Echo

Great Lakes Echo

http://greatlakesecho.org/2021/12/07/grant-program-repels-great-lakes-invaders/

Guest Contributor

Behavior-altering chemicals produced by sea lamprey may decrease the invaders’ populations in the Great Lakes.

The post Chemical sex attraction may curb invasive sea lamprey, new study says first appeared on Great Lakes Echo.

Original Article

Great Lakes Echo

Great Lakes Echo

http://greatlakesecho.org/2021/11/17/chemical-sex-attraction-may-curb-invasive-sea-lamprey-new-study-says/

Guest Contributor

A record number of mussel-fouled watercraft have been intercepted at state inspection stations this summer

By Bernie Azure, Char-Koosta News

This article is part of a collaboration between The Char-Koosta News and Great Lakes Now at Detroit Public Television. Our partnership brings readers stories about issues of, research about and solutions to the invasive mussel problem – a challenge that’s shared by communities around Flathead Lake, its nearby waters and the Great Lakes.

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Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2021/10/record-mussel-fouled-watercraft-intercepted-state-inspection-stations-summer/

Char-Koosta News

Great Lakes Protection Fund: Award celebrates work tackling plastics, invasives, equity

Their daily work aims at reducing microplastics and invasive species in the Great Lakes, increasing attention to equity in the region’s environmentalism, helping communities finance water infrastructure, and better connecting foundations in coastline cities.

For this, six individuals from around the Great Lakes region earned a 2021 leadership award from the Great Lakes Protection Fund.

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Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2021/09/great-lakes-protection-fund-award-plastics-invasives-equity/

GLN Editor

You could say that preventing the spread of aquatic invasive species (AIS) is a team sport. While it takes the professional efforts of natural resource managers, AIS specialists and others in the environmental field, it also takes the cooperation of the public.

Professionals encourage and rely on boaters, anglers and other outdoor enthusiasts to take preventative actions such as cleaning, draining and drying their boats and other watercraft and not moving water or live bait from one lake to another. Successful management of AIS and the help of a vigilant public go hand in hand.

Yet for community members to take necessary actions, they must first be aware of the negative impacts AIS can have and how to stop their spread. Communicating with them about AIS in an effective way is vital.

New research from Wisconsin Sea Grant Aquatic Invasive Species Outreach Specialist Tim Campbell, University of Wisconsin-Madison Associate Professor Bret Shaw and consultant Barry T. Radler sheds new light on such communication. The researchers analyzed which communication strategies are most effective and which may pose unintended problems. Shaw is a faculty member in the Department of Life Sciences Communication and is also an environmental communication specialist in the university’s Division of Extension.

The team’s findings were published online Aug. 14 in the journal Environmental Management (“Testing Emphasis Message Frames and Metaphors on Social Media to Engage Boaters to Learn about Preventing the Spread of Zebra Mussels”).

This advertisement is an example of the “science” message framing–a straightforward, factual approach. (Artwork by Brooke Alexander)

The trio used Facebook as a platform to test five types of messages—each invoking a different metaphor or message frame—to educate people about zebra mussels, a significant problem in the Great Lakes and elsewhere. These communication strategies can shape how people understand and form opinions about complex issues.

Paid advertising on Facebook and the social media site’s message-testing feature enabled the researchers to present these different messages to 270,000 people in Wisconsin with an interest in lakes, boating or fishing.

Although the ads presented messages similar to those commonly used in invasive species communication, up until this point little testing had actually been done about their effectiveness. The commonly used message frames were dubbed hitchhiker, militaristic, nativist, science and protective. The messages were paired with artwork by Brooke Alexander.

Many communication goals, the team found, can be achieved by using fact-based or more positive message frames. In general, the science frame—a direct, factual approach—will always perform at least as well as nativist and militaristic frames.

Said Campbell, “This work provides real-world results that can help those working with invasive species achieve their desired communication results, while avoiding possible unintended consequences from their messaging.” For example, nativist message framing (e.g., “alien,” “exotic”) can have unwanted xenophobic connotations while also not performing better than other frames on any tested metric.

Militaristic message framing can be fraught with unintended connotations. (Artwork by Brooke Alexander)

Similarly, militaristic framing (such as stating we are “at war” with invasive species) can create potentially unhealthy relationships with nature and misguided views on how to manage invasive species.

Shaw noted that the metrics tested for the Facebook ads included cost-per-click, shares and comments. As he explained, “Many scholars and AIS professionals have debated the use of nativist or militaristic language in prevention campaigns, since many of them find that language to be fraught with unwanted implications. Based on our research, we recommend that outreach professionals skip those nativist and militaristic frames and focus instead on clearly communicated science.”

The team’s journal article may be read online. The research was supported by Wisconsin Sea Grant and the University of Wisconsin-Madison Division of Extension.

For further information, contact Campbell at tim.campbell@wisc.edu.

The post New research provides guidance for effective public messaging about invasive species prevention first appeared on Wisconsin Sea Grant.

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Jennifer Smith

Great Lakes in Peril: Invasives, pollution, climate change

By Lester Graham, Michigan Radio

The Great Lakes News Collaborative includes Bridge Michigan; Circle of Blue; Great Lakes Now at Detroit Public Television; and Michigan Radio, Michigan’s NPR News Leader; who work together to bring audiences news and information about the impact of climate change, pollution, and aging infrastructure on the Great Lakes and drinking water.

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Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2021/08/great-lakes-peril-invasives-pollution-climate-change/

Michigan Radio

Invasive weed starry stonewort confirmed in Leech Lake, Minnesota

ST. PAUL, Minn. (AP) — An invasive weed that can choke out native plants and fish habitat has been found in one of Minnesota’s largest and most popular walleye lakes, the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources said Monday.

The DNR has confirmed the discovery of starry stonewort in Leech Lake, located in northwestern Minnesota.

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Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2021/07/ap-invasive-weed-starry-stonewort-leech-lake/

The Associated Press

Worries over racism, waterways inspire push to rename fish

TRAVERSE CITY, Mich. (AP) — Minnesota state Sen. Foung Hawj was never a fan of the “Asian carp” label commonly applied to four imported fish species that are wreaking havoc in the U.S. heartland, infesting numerous rivers and bearing down on the Great Lakes.

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Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2021/07/ap-worries-racism-waterways-rename-fish-invasive-asian-carp/

The Associated Press

Invasive Tracking: Researchers trying to trace zebra mussel infestations

While initial populations of invasive zebra mussels were brought to the Great Lakes on boats and in freighter ballast water, a new source of the invasive species has researchers concerned — pet stores.

The Minnesota Aquatic Invasive Species Research Center has partnered with the University of Minnesota Genomics Center to genetically trace zebra mussels that have been found in aquarium moss balls in pet stores.

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Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2021/07/invasive-zebra-mussel-research-genetic-testing/

Rachel Duckett

Researchers find relationship between invasive zebra mussels, toxic algae

This article was republished here with permission from Great Lakes Echo.

By McKoy Scribner, Great Lakes Echo

Scientists from the W.K. Kellogg Biological Station first noticed an invasive population of zebra mussels in Gull Lake in the mid-1990s. Afterwards, unexpected harmful algal blooms started appearing.

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Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2021/07/researchers-invasive-zebra-mussels-toxic-algae/

Great Lakes Echo

Low but Stable: Yellow perch populations in Great Lakes’ bays and open waters

On first attempt to reach Michigan Department of Natural Resources Fisheries Research Biologist David Fielder, he wasn’t monitoring fish populations or water quality. He was busy with a perch basket lunch.

The yellow perch is a staple of Great Lakes commercial and recreational fishing, and Friday fish fries.

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Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2021/07/yellow-perch-low-populations-wisconsin-michigan-fishing/

John McCracken

Canada expands ballast water restrictions to reduce invasive species spread

By Lester Graham, Michigan Radio

The Great Lakes News Collaborative includes Bridge Michigan; Circle of Blue; Great Lakes Now at Detroit Public Television; and Michigan Radio, Michigan’s NPR News Leader; who work together to bring audiences news and information about the impact of climate change, pollution, and aging infrastructure on the Great Lakes and drinking water.

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Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2021/06/canada-ballast-water-restrictions-invasive-species/

Michigan Radio

Citizen Science Opportunities: How can you get involved in scientific research?

For some, getting to contribute to scientific research might sound like a far-fetched possibility.

Jason Frenzel, stewardship coordinator at the Huron River Watershed Council, is one of the countless people working to change that assumption.

The HRWC is one of many organizations in the Great Lakes region that offer people, most with little prior scientific training, the opportunity to participate in science.

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Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2021/06/citizen-science-opportunities/

Noah Bock

New anglers could depress Great Lakes fish populations more than invasive species

This article was republished here with permission from Great Lakes Echo.

By Brandon Chew, Great Lakes Echo

More fishing trips could cause more damage to native fish populations in the Canadian portion of the Great Lakes than aquatic invasive species, according to a recent study.

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Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2021/06/new-anglers-great-lakes-fish-populations-invasive-species/

Great Lakes Echo

If it’s summerish time, it’s mussel time

This article is part of a collaboration between The Char-Koosta News and Great Lakes Now at Detroit Public Television. Our partnership brings readers stories about issues of, research about and solutions to the invasive mussel problem – a challenge that’s shared by communities around Flathead Lake, its nearby waters and the Great Lakes.

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Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2021/05/summer-time-invasive-mussel-boat-inspections/

Char-Koosta News

If it’s summerish time, it’s mussel time

This article is part of a collaboration between The Char-Koosta News and Great Lakes Now at Detroit Public Television. Our partnership brings readers stories about issues of, research about and solutions to the invasive mussel problem – a challenge that’s shared by communities around Flathead Lake, its nearby waters and the Great Lakes.

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Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2021/05/summer-time-invasive-mussel-boat-inspections/

Char-Koosta News

Cost of a quagga and zebra mussel infestation

This article is part of a collaboration between The Char-Koosta News and Great Lakes Now at Detroit Public Television. Our partnership brings readers stories about issues of, research about and solutions to the invasive mussel problem – a challenge that’s shared by communities around Flathead Lake, its nearby waters and the Great Lakes.

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Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2021/05/cost-quagga-zebra-mussel-infestation/

Char-Koosta News

Cost of a quagga and zebra mussel infestation

This article is part of a collaboration between The Char-Koosta News and Great Lakes Now at Detroit Public Television. Our partnership brings readers stories about issues of, research about and solutions to the invasive mussel problem – a challenge that’s shared by communities around Flathead Lake, its nearby waters and the Great Lakes.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

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Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2021/05/cost-quagga-zebra-mussel-infestation/

Char-Koosta News

Invasive mussels found in aquarium moss balls sold in Montana

This article is part of a collaboration between The Char-Koosta News and Great Lakes Now at Detroit Public Television. Our partnership brings readers stories about issues of, research about and solutions to the invasive mussel problem – a challenge that’s shared by communities around Flathead Lake, its nearby waters and the Great Lakes.

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Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2021/05/invasive-mussels-aquarium-moss-balls-montana/

Char-Koosta News

Invasive mussels found in aquarium moss balls sold in Montana

This article is part of a collaboration between The Char-Koosta News and Great Lakes Now at Detroit Public Television. Our partnership brings readers stories about issues of, research about and solutions to the invasive mussel problem – a challenge that’s shared by communities around Flathead Lake, its nearby waters and the Great Lakes.

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Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2021/05/invasive-mussels-aquarium-moss-balls-montana/

Char-Koosta News

Combined Mussels: Great Lakes Now and Flathead Reservation newspaper partner to share stories

As the official newspaper of the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Indian Reservation, the Char-Koosta News has frequent coverage of environmental issues in western Montana especially in tribal lands and waters.

One of those issues is invasive mussels – the same zebra and quagga mussels that plague the Great Lakes and inland rivers and lakes throughout the region.

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Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2021/05/great-lakes-now-flathead-reservation-newspaper-partner-invasive-mussels-stories/

GLN Editor

More fishing trips could cause more damage to native fish populations in the Canadian portion of the Great Lakes than aquatic invasive species, according to a recent study.

The post New anglers could depress Great Lakes fish populations more than invasive species first appeared on Great Lakes Echo.

Original Article

Great Lakes Echo

Great Lakes Echo

http://greatlakesecho.org/2021/05/25/new-anglers-could-depress-great-lakes-fish-populations-more-than-invasive-species/

Guest Contributor

The new hitchhikers in the Great Lakes region aren’t stopping drivers with a thumbs up. They’re riding moss balls across the ocean.

The post Forget freighter ballast, these mussels got here on moss balls first appeared on Great Lakes Echo.

Original Article

Great Lakes Echo

Great Lakes Echo

http://greatlakesecho.org/2021/05/03/forget-freighter-ballast-these-mussels-got-here-on-moss-balls/

Guest Contributor

Accurate information about murder hornets must be provided to the public to limit their spread and protect native bee populations, an entomology researcher told the Michigan Beekeepers Association. 

The post Entomology researcher explains the dangers of murder hornets first appeared on Great Lakes Echo.

Original Article

Great Lakes Echo

Great Lakes Echo

http://greatlakesecho.org/2021/03/31/entomology-researcher-explains-the-dangers-of-murder-hornets/

Guest Contributor

Early Detection: When it comes to Great Lakes invasives, prevention is the only cure

Of the many possible new invasive threats to the Great Lakes, 144 stand out in particular, according to a study released in 2021.

The study lists 144 fish, plants and invertebrates that could invade the Great Lakes or expand their range within them. The species were listed by the risk of damage they pose to the Great Lakes environment or culture and the likelihood they’d be introduced by one of six pathways.

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Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2021/03/great-lakes-invasive-species-early-detection/

Andrew Blok

Last dam standing: Traverse City fish restoration project on the ropes

By Kelly House, Bridge Michigan, through the Institute for Nonprofit News network

The Great Lakes News Collaborative includes Bridge Michigan; Circle of Blue; Great Lakes Now at Detroit Public Television; and Michigan Radio, Michigan’s NPR News Leader; who work together to bring audiences news and information about the impact of climate change, pollution, and aging infrastructure on the Great Lakes and drinking water.

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Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2021/03/dam-traverse-city-fish-restoration-project/

Bridge Michigan

The future of Lake Superior with climate disruption

With warming temperatures, fluctuating water levels and a series of extreme storms, Lake Superior is undergoing dramatic alterations amid climate change.

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Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2021/02/future-lake-superior-climate-disruption-climate-change/

Michigan Radio

30 Years Later: Mussel invasion legacy reaches far beyond Great Lakes

The way J. Ellen Marsden remembers it, when she first suggested calling a new Great Lakes invasive species the quagga mussel, her colleague laughed, so the name stuck.

At the same time, it was no laughing matter. The arrival of a second non-native mussel, related to the already established zebra mussel, was a major complication in what was becoming one of the most significant invasive species events in American history.

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Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2021/02/invasive-mussels-legacy-beyond-great-lakes/

Andrew Blok

Mussel-Phosphorus Puzzle: Invasive mussels are reshaping the chemistry of the Great Lakes

Since the late 1980s, four of the five Great Lakes have played host to an increasing number of invasive mussels. First came zebra mussels, followed shortly thereafter by quagga mussels, both members of the Dreissenid family whose native range includes the waters around Ukraine.

Today, the filter-feeders comprise more than 90% of the total animal biomass of the Great Lakes (barring Lake Superior, whose depth and water chemistry make it a less suitable habitat for the two species of mussel).

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Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2021/01/invasive-mussels-phosphorus-chemistry-great-lakes/

Lorraine Boissoneault

Deal reached on project to protect lakes from invasive fish

TRAVERSE CITY, Mich. (AP) — Michigan, Illinois and a federal agency have agreed on funding the next phase of an initiative to keep Asian carp out of the Great Lakes by strengthening defenses on a Chicago-area waterway, officials said Thursday.

The two states and the U.S.

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Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2021/01/ap-deal-reached-brandon-road-project-asian-carp/

The Associated Press

2020 Vision: Great Lakes Now year in review predicts 2021

This is part of a series in which the Great Lakes Now staff looks back on 2020.

It’s probably futile to try to find ONE moment that captures 2020 for Great Lakes Now, at least from my view today at my dining room table/desk on a grey winter day.

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Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2020/12/great-lakes-now-year-in-review-predicts-2021/

Sandra Svoboda

Wilder Harrier, a Canadian pet food company, is using another unlikely alternative protein source to have a low environmental impact, yet a nutritious meal for dogs.

The post Asian carp goes from water to dog dishes first appeared on Great Lakes Echo.

Original Article

Great Lakes Echo

Great Lakes Echo

http://greatlakesecho.org/2020/12/15/asian-carp-goes-from-water-to-dog-dishes/

Guest Contributor

Public Concern: Climate change, runoff and chemicals at the forefront of people’s worries about the Great Lakes

NOTE: The report will formally be presented in English at 2 p.m. ET on Thursday, Dec. 10. A French session will follow at 3:30 p.m. For more details about how you can watch or ask questions, click here.

Public concern about climate change is escalating in the Great Lakes region, according to a new report issued by a binational group that manages and protects the Great Lakes.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2020/12/public-concern-climate-change-runoff-chemicals-ijc/

Natasha Blakely

“Saving the Great Lakes”: National Geographic December issue explores the lakes and their struggles

A familiar view for many who live and play around the Great Lakes graces the current cover of National Geographic – a stormy sunset over Lake Michigan, seen from the sandy beaches of the Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore.

The feature story of the magazine’s December 2020 issue puts a spotlight on the Great Lakes.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2020/11/saving-great-lakes-national-geographic-december-issue-struggles/

Natasha Blakely

Q & A: The Great Lakes are stressed. Climate change is making it worse.

By Kelly House, Bridge Michigan, through the Institute for Nonprofit News network

The Great Lakes News Collaborative includes Bridge Michigan; Circle of Blue; Great Lakes Now at Detroit Public Television; and Michigan Radio, Michigan’s NPR News Leader; who work together to bring audiences news and information about the impact of climate change, pollution, and aging infrastructure on the Great Lakes and drinking water.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2020/11/great-lakes-stressed-climate-change-worse/

Bridge Michigan

Great Lakes Freighters: The latest on navigation, locks and icebreakers

It’s been 140 years since a group of U.S. steamship companies formed an alliance called the Cleveland Vessel Owners Association, whose primary purpose was to promote safe navigation by the ships that plied the Great Lakes.

That original alliance has since become the Lake Carriers’ Association, which is still based in Cleveland and represents the interests of companies that have a combined 46 vessels on the lakes and move 90 million tons of cargo annually.

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Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2020/10/great-lakes-freighters-lake-carriers-association/

Gary Wilson

Genetic Engineering: Researchers take first steps toward controlling sea lamprey

Early in October, scientists who pioneered a powerful gene-editing technology won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry. That same technology is now being used to explore new ways to control invasive sea lamprey in the Great Lakes.

When researchers suggested earlier this year that it might be possible to eradicate sea lamprey from the Great Lakes, it was with developing gene-editing technology in mind.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2020/10/genetic-engineering-research-controlling-sea-lamprey/

Andrew Blok

‘Big pile’ of eels dumped in NYC park; impact not yet known

NEW YORK (AP) — Andrew Orkin was taking a break from his evening jog to sit by Prospect Park Lake when he turned around and was startled to see a tangle of wriggling snakes.

“And quite a big pile — fully alive,” said Orkin, a music composer who lives near the Brooklyn park.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2020/10/ap-eels-dumped-nyc-park/

The Associated Press

Carp Advance: Real and potential impacts of invasive fish throughout the Midwest

Since their introduction years ago, invasive Asian carp have infested rivers and lakes around the United States.

But they’ve been kept out of the Great Lakes — so far.

Some steps have been taken to protect the lakes system, but many believe that more effective policies — and more substantial barriers — are needed to keep the fish from spreading and to reduce the numbers where they’re already established.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2020/10/carp-impacts-invasive-fish-midwest/

GLN Editor

Complete Eradication: Researchers look at removing sea lamprey from the Great Lakes

Sea lamprey control in the Great Lakes has been a success.

Compared to the 1950s, 90% fewer of the toothy, invasive, eel-like parasite are spawning.

Control efforts have been so successful that some researchers now suggest a more permanent solution: complete eradication of the pest from the Great Lakes.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2020/09/sea-lamprey-invasive-species-research-eradication-great-lakes/

Andrew Blok

Invasive aquatic plant found in 4 Michigan inland lakes

LANSING, Mich. (AP) — An invasive aquatic plant — first detected in southeastern Michigan in 1996 — has been found in four inland lakes in Washtenaw and Jackson counties.

The presence of European frogbit has been confirmed within the Waterloo Recreation Area, according to Michigan’s Department of Environment, Great Lakes, and Energy.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2020/09/ap-frogbit-invasive-aquatic-plant-michigan-inland-lakes/

The Associated Press

Michigan House OKs spending on jobless benefits, flood costs

LANSING, Mich. (AP) — Michigan lawmakers on Tuesday began approving a budget bill that would authorize the federal government’s supplemental $300-a-week unemployment benefit during the coronavirus pandemic and provide $6 million in state funding for costs related to devastating flooding in the Midland area.

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Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2020/09/ap-michigan-house-jobless-benefits-flood-costs/

The Associated Press

Michigan’s State of the Great Lakes: Drinking water quality garners spotlight

In her first regional appearance after taking office in January 2019, Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer made it clear that Michigan would take a leadership role on Great Lakes issues.

“Michigan has to lead on Great Lakes issues,” Whitmer told Great Lakes Now after speaking to fellow Great Lakes governors and Canadian premiers and the broader Great Lakes community in Milwaukee.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2020/08/michigan-state-great-lakes-drinking-water-quality/

Gary Wilson

Offshore Decline: Great Lakes fish populations at risk from low nutrient levels

As algal blooms flourish on the edges of the Great Lakes, lake management bodies look to cut down the flow of nutrients into the water that feeds the algae. But, as a recent report by the International Joint Commission explains, not all parts of the lakes suffer from too many nutrients — in fact, the deeper offshore waters aren’t getting enough.

Read Now at Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Now

Great Lakes Now

https://www.greatlakesnow.org/2020/08/offshore-great-lakes-fish-populations-nutrient-levels/

Emily Simroth