Green Bay Waterfront News (Page 41)

The question of why it took the United States so long to aid in Europe during the Holocaust has been widely debated in history, due to confusion over what groups knew about the atrocity taking place and just how much information was available. When…

Having established itself as a beacon of historiographical under- standing and undergraduate ambition, one can only imagine my excitement when presented with the opportunity to become Editor- in-Chief of e Great Lakes Journal of Undergraduate Histo…

While exposure was low at most sites, USGS scientists found high concentrations of dioxins and furans in tree swallow eggs from Midland, Michigan, and from the Saginaw River and Bay.​​​​​​​ (Thomas W. Custer, USGS)
Birds at most study sites in the Grea…

Results of the study indicate the potential for small fish to be transported through the electric dispersal barrier, which was built to keep invasive species such as Asian carp from passing between the Mississippi River and Great Lakes Basins. However,…

In a recent episode of Blue Sky Science, Faith Fitzpatrick (USGS) discussed how waterfalls are made and how long they last.
Blue Sky Science, a collaboration of the Wisconsin State Journal and the Morgridge Institute for Research, finds local experts t…

Caption below
Welcome to the New USGS.GOV
Our new user experience makes world-class USGS science, data, information, and products more easily accessible, available, and usable.
 
Just the tip of the iceberg…
Our transitional site includes the new usgs….

Citizens and stakeholders are invited to learn more about the recently completed Little Plover River Groundwater Model and Optimization Study at an informational meeting hosted by the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources on April 12, 2016.  
Ken B…

On Feb. 18, 2016, WI WSC scientist Austin Baldwin presented preliminary findings on microplastics in Great Lakes tributaries to the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy’s Subcommittee on Water Availability and Quality. This study sampled…

WI WSC scientist Dave Krabbenhoft met with staff of the House Natural Resources Committee on Jan. 11, 2016, to discuss a new tool that can “fingerprint”, or identify, Great Lakes mercury sources such as atmospheric, industrial, or watershed runoff. Det…

Scientists collect a snapshot of a bird’s life when they capture, band, and release it. Each coded band and any data collected at the same time like date, location, sex, age etc. are recorded in a database that can be shared by scientists around the world. When the same bird is seen somewhere else, that … Continue reading Snapshots that help conserve shorebirds in decline

Annual average stream temperatures in the Trout Lake watershed, Wisconsin, could increase from one to three degrees Celsius by the year 2100, which might negatively affect cold water fish like brook trout.  
The U.S. Geological Survey recently modeled …

Earth Day is April 22nd and is celebrating its 45th anniversary this year. This year we want to celebrate the month of April by showcasing our commitment to protecting the environmental health of our local communities, Wisconsin and the planet through environmentally based education, research and outreach at UW—Green Bay, the Original EcoU! The Northeast … Continue reading Understanding Deep Water

Earth Day is April 22nd and is celebrating its 45th anniversary this year. This year we want to celebrate the month of April by showcasing our commitment to protecting the environmental health of our local communities, Wisconsin and the planet through environmentally based education, research and outreach at UW—Green Bay, the Original EcoU!   North … Continue reading Mussel Man!

Dr. Michael Draney (Natural and Applied Sciences) and James Steffen (Chicago Botanic Garden) recently published an article in the journal Great Lakes Entomologist titled “Disjunct Lake Michigan populations of two Atlantic Coast spiders, Disembolus bairdi and Grammonota pallipes (Araneae: Linyphiidae)”. Steffen and Draney discovered two species of spiders living on the beaches of Lake Michigan … Continue reading Spiders in Search of Beachfront Real Estate!

Almost 80% of songbirds that nest in Wisconsin are migratory, many traveling vast distances every spring and fall. Songbirds typically migrate at night and seek out patches of natural habitat at daybreak where they can rest. These areas must provide shelter from storms and predators, as well as provide high quality food resources so the … Continue reading Bird Banding at Point au Sable

In the area around the City of Green Bay many trees have lost all or most of their leaves, especially the commonest and most abundant species such as green ash (Fraxinus pennsylvanica), box elder (Acer negundo), and cottonwood (Populus deltoides). Other species generally leafless now include: white birch (Betula papyrifera), quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides), and … Continue reading Past Peak