Ann Arbor, Mich. –  A report released by the Great Lakes Commission finds that 37.8 million gallons of water per day were withdrawn from the Great Lakes basin in 2020, a close to 3% decrease from 2019 withdrawals. According to the 2020 Annual Report of the Great Lakes Regional Water Use Database, thermoelectric power production, public water supply, and industrial use were the primary water use sectors. Only 5% of the total reported water withdrawn was consumed or otherwise lost from the basin.

The report’s findings were shared at the December meeting of the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence River Water Resources Regional Body and the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence River Basin Compact Council. Since 1988, the eight states and two provinces in the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence River basin have submitted water use data to the Great Lakes Commission. The GLC compiles and summarizes these datasets into an annual report, which is presented to the Regional Body and Compact Council.

“The water use data published annually by the Great Lakes Commission helps to ensure that regional decision-makers protect and use the waters of our Great Lakes wisely,” said Timothy Bruno, Great Lakes Commissioner, chief of the Office of the Great Lakes at the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection, and designated chair of the Regional Body. “With the growing effects of climate change and extreme weather on the basin, carefully managing our resources will be even more critical in the years to come.”

To read the report, visit waterusedata.glc.org.

Original Article

Great Lakes Commission

Great Lakes Commission

https://www.glc.org/news/water-use-database-121721

Beth Wanamaker

New York State has released cleanup plans for the former Bethlehem Steel site in Lackawanna. Construction to advance the cleanup plan is expected to begin in 2022, the state said it will address site-wide contamination and provide public access to Lake Erie for the first time in more than 100 years. Read the full story by WKBW-TV – Buffalo, NY.

Original Article

Great Lakes Commission

Great Lakes Commission

https://www.glc.org/dailynews/20211124-bethlehem

Beth Wanamaker

News

Great Lakes Commission applauds historic bipartisan infrastructure investment

Ann Arbor, Mich. – The Great Lakes Commission (GLC) today applauded Congress and the Biden Administration for enacting the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act. The bipartisan infrastructure legislation includes significant investments in key Great Lakes priorities, including $1 billion in funding for the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative, $55 billion for drinking water and wastewater projects, $10 billion for action on emerging contaminants such as PFAS, $2.25 billion for port infrastructure development grants, and $1.9 billion for Army Corps of Engineers aquatic restoration projects.

“The Great Lakes Commission is grateful to our region’s bipartisan congressional delegation and President Biden for their work on the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act,” said GLC Chair Todd L. Ambs, deputy secretary for the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources. “This legislation represents historic investment in longstanding GLC priorities, including $1 billion for the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative. Since it was launched in 2010, the GLRI has funded more than 5,000 projects across the Great Lakes. These projects have cleaned up toxic contamination, restored wetlands, prevented the spread of aquatic invasive species and more. They also produce a substantial return on investment, with every dollar spent generating an estimated $3.35 in additional economic activity.”

In June, the GLC led a coalition of regional agencies, legislators, mayors, and business and environmental groups in urging Congressional leaders to include key Great Lakes priorities in the legislation. The GLC will continue to advocate for Great Lakes priorities in upcoming legislation, including investments in climate resiliency and Great Lakes icebreaking capacity. 


The Great Lakes Commission, led by chair Todd L. Ambs, deputy secretary of the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, is a binational government agency established in 1955 to protect the Great Lakes and the economies and ecosystems they support. Its membership includes leaders from the eight U.S. states and two Canadian provinces in the Great Lakes basin. The GLC recommends policies and practices to balance the use, development, and conservation of the water resources of the Great Lakes and brings the region together to work on issues that no single community, state, province, or nation can tackle alone. Learn more at www.glc.org.

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Great Lakes Commission

Great Lakes Commission

https://www.glc.org/news/infrastructure-111521

Beth Wanamaker

Wayne Valliere is an artist-in-residence at Northwestern University and one of only a handful of Native birchbark canoe builders left in the United States. His canoe’s recent launch into a choppy Lake Michigan is likely unprecedented in modern times. Read the full story by The Star.

Original Article

Great Lakes Commission

Great Lakes Commission

https://www.glc.org/dailynews/20211110-canoe

Beth Wanamaker

Several Great Lakes states mark popular gamefish with an adipose fin clip. If anglers catch an adipose fin clipped fish, they should turn in the head at a local drop-off station. Fish tag returns help biologists understand survival, age and movements of important sport fish. Read the full story by the Manistee News.

Original Article

Great Lakes Commission

Great Lakes Commission

https://www.glc.org/dailynews/20211110-adipose

Beth Wanamaker

Minnesota pollution officials on Monday released a proposed impaired waters list for 2022, an update that included the addition of 15 northeastern and central Minnesota water bodies where fish have been contaminated with long-lasting chemicals. Read the full story by the Associated Press.

Original Article

Great Lakes Commission

Great Lakes Commission

https://www.glc.org/dailynews/20211110-impaired

Beth Wanamaker

The Saginaw Bay Watershed Initiative Network announced that a total of 4,055 sturgeon, including an additional 728 this fall, have been released into the Cass, Tittabawassee, Flint, and Shiawassee rivers since 2017. Read the full story by MLive.

Original Article

Great Lakes Commission

Great Lakes Commission

https://www.glc.org/dailynews/20211110-sturgeon

Beth Wanamaker

Researchers are hoping new data from research buoys that were pulled from the water this week will help them monitor Lake Michigan. These buoys were deployed in partnership with Northwestern Michigan College and Michigan Technological University. Read the full story by WPBN-TV – Traverse City, MI.

Original Article

Great Lakes Commission

Great Lakes Commission

https://www.glc.org/dailynews/20211110-yeah-buoy

Beth Wanamaker

Results from a survey of 241 municipalities in the Great Lakes Basin show coastal damage from climate change in these regions will cost at least $1.94 billion over the next five years. Those same communities have already spent $878 million on coastal damages over the past two years. Read the full story by the Manitowoc Herald Times Reporter.

Original Article

Great Lakes Commission

Great Lakes Commission

https://www.glc.org/dailynews/20211110-climate

Beth Wanamaker

Great Lakes fish and wildlife populations would get a boost under a bill introduced in the U.S. Senate. Supporters say the Great Lakes Fish and Wildlife Restoration Act will provide critical resources to conserve and restore fish and wildlife populations across the region. Read the full story by the Duluth News Tribune.

Original Article

Great Lakes Commission

Great Lakes Commission

https://www.glc.org/dailynews/20211105-legislation

Beth Wanamaker

News

Great Lakes Commission elects new chair; tackles climate resiliency, infrastructure, mercury contamination, and algal blooms at 2021 Annual Meeting

Ann Arbor, Mich. –The Great Lakes Commission (GLC) passed resolutions expressing its priorities on climate resiliency, infrastructure investment, mercury contamination, and nutrient-driven algal blooms at its 2021 Annual Meeting, held online this week.

At the meeting, the GLC also elected a new chair and vice chair and signed a memorandum of understanding with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to advance mutual goals for Great Lakes conservation, protection, sustainable use and development. The MOU recognizes the GLC’s unique ability to ensure that scientific information is brought to policymakers and managers in a timely and effective manner, as well as engage its state and provincial membership to identify priority areas of scientific inquiry.

“The Great Lakes Commission is committed to bringing its binational membership together to work on real solutions for the biggest issues facing the lakes, in collaboration with our partners at the federal, tribal, state, provincial and local level,” said outgoing GLC Chair Sharon M. Jackson, Deputy General Counsel to Indiana Governor Eric J. Holcomb. “The resolutions passed today speak to the enthusiasm of our party states and provinces for this difficult but rewarding work. I am grateful to our commissioners, observers, and friends for their partnership with the GLC and contributions to our meeting.”

Commissioners elected Todd L. Ambs, deputy secretary of the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, as its chair and Mary Mertz, director of the Ohio Department of Natural Resources, as its vice chair.

“I am excited to serve as chair after rejoining the Wisconsin delegation to the Great Lakes Commission two years ago,” said Ambs. “As a longtime advocate for the lakes, I know that the GLC is a terrific forum for collaboration. I am particularly looking forward to working with our commissioners and partners as we draft our strategic plan for 2022 – 2027.” 

During the meeting, the GLC assembled expert panels on nearshore nutrient reductions, mercury contamination in the Great Lakes ecosystem, and building resilient communities in the basin. Commissioners and guests also heard from the U.S. EPA’s Office of Water on water infrastructure and other priorities and USGS on its recently released Great Lakes Science Forum report, which assessed data gaps and science needs across the Great Lakes ecosystem. Commissioners also recognized Thomas Crane, the GLC’s long-serving deputy director, with an honorary resolution of recognition and appreciation for 35 years of service.

Video of meeting sessions will be available online in the near future. In March, the GLC will host annual Great Lakes Day events in Washington, D.C., and it will next convene in June for its semiannual meeting in Green Bay, Wisconsin.


The Great Lakes Commission, led by chair Todd L. Ambs, deputy secretary of the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, is a binational government agency established in 1955 to protect the Great Lakes and the economies and ecosystems they support. Its membership includes leaders from the eight U.S. states and two Canadian provinces in the Great Lakes basin. The GLC recommends policies and practices to balance the use, development, and conservation of the water resources of the Great Lakes and brings the region together to work on issues that no single community, state, province, or nation can tackle alone. Learn more at www.glc.org.

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For media inquiries, please contact Beth Wanamaker, beth@glc.org.

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Great Lakes Commission

Great Lakes Commission

https://www.glc.org/news/am-101421

Beth Wanamaker

News

Great Lakes Commission awards more than $1.5 million to reduce runoff and improve water quality

Ann Arbor, Mich. – The Great Lakes Commission (GLC) announced today that it will award more than $1.5 million in grants to reduce the runoff of sediment, nutrients, and other pollutants into the Great Lakes and their tributaries through the Great Lakes Sediment and Nutrient Reduction Program.

“The Great Lakes Commission is proud to help our state and local communities improve water quality through the Great Lakes Sediment and Nutrient Reduction Program,” said Sharon M. Jackson, chair of the GLC and deputy general counsel to Indiana Governor Eric Holcomb. “This year we are thrilled to celebrate 30 years of conservation efforts and partnerships through this unique program. Over the last three decades, these projects have prevented millions of pounds of phosphorus and tons of sediment from reaching the Great Lakes. Congratulations to the 2021 grantees; your work contributes to a healthy Great Lakes basin.”

Each year, the Great Lakes Sediment and Nutrient Reduction Program provides competitive grants to local, state and tribal governments and nonprofit organizations to install erosion and nutrient control practices in the Great Lakes basin. These practices are important to preventing harmful algal blooms and dead zones. The program supports projects not typically funded by other federal cost-share programs, including innovative and unique practices. The 2021 projects generally focus on three approaches: long-term sediment and nutrient management through engagement with the agricultural community, streambank restoration, and green infrastructure.

The following grants have been awarded:

Project

Grantee

Amount

State

St. Joseph Riverbank Stabilization at Riverside Drive

City of South Bend Department of Public Works – Division of Engineering

$200,000

Indiana

Reintroducing Wetlands to the Pierson Drain

Muskegon County Water Resources Commissioner

$200,000

Michigan

Owasco Lake Nutrient Reduction Project

Cayuga County Soil & Water Conservation District

$149,246

New York

Eighteenmile Creek Sediment and Nutrient Reduction Project

Erie County Soil & Water Conservation District

$200,000

New York

Sediment and Nutrient Reduction in the Headwaters of the Oswego River Watershed

Yates County Soil & Water Conservation District

$195,227

New York

Converting Cropland to Restored Floodplain in the Howard Run-Blanchard River Watershed

Blanchard River Watershed Partnership

$129,070

Ohio

Fulton Williams Conservation Initiative (Beaver Creek, Brush Creek, Deer Creek, Mill Creek)

Fulton Soil & Water Conservation District

$196,925

Ohio

Two-Stage Ditch and Filter Strip Installation in AI Creek Watershed

Toledo Area Sanitary District

$26,878

Ohio

Increase Adoption of Soil Health Conservation Systems in the Rat River Watershed

Fox-Wolf Watershed Alliance

$199,366

Wisconsin

Funding for the Great Lakes Sediment and Nutrient Reduction Program is provided by the U.S. Department of Agriculture – Natural Resources Conservation Service under the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative (GLRI). Since it was first funded in 2010, the GLRI has provided more than $4 billion to fund more than 5000 projects across the Great Lakes region. The projects have cleaned up toxic hot spots, restored wetlands, helped to prevent the spread of aquatic invasive species and reduced harmful sediment and excess nutrients to the most significant surface freshwater resource on the planet, the Great Lakes.

More information about the projects is available at www.nutrientreduction.org.


The Great Lakes Commission, led by chair Sharon M. Jackson, Deputy General Counsel for Governor Eric J. Holcomb of Indiana, is a binational government agency established in 1955 to protect the Great Lakes and the economies and ecosystems they support. Its membership includes leaders from the eight U.S. states and two Canadian provinces in the Great Lakes basin. The GLC recommends policies and practices to balance the use, development, and conservation of the water resources of the Great Lakes and brings the region together to work on issues that no single community, state, province, or nation can tackle alone. Learn more at www.glc.org.

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Great Lakes Commission

Great Lakes Commission

https://www.glc.org/news/glsnrp-093021

Beth Wanamaker

News

Great Lakes Commission and partners release action plan for growing Great Lakes Blue Economy

Ann Arbor, Mich. – An action plan released today recommends building blocks for growing the Great Lakes basin economy by leveraging the economic potential of the region’s freshwater resources. Leaders from more than 50 Great Lakes agencies and organizations, convened by the Great Lakes Commission (GLC), developed the action plan as roadmap for collective action and a challenge to regional decision-makers to take strategic action.

The plan recommends actions to help the region: develop a cohesive vision and organizational structure; advance its water research, education, technology and innovation sectors; create a unique Great Lakes brand and strategically market the Great Lakes Blue Economy at the national and international levels; and establish and track shared goals and metrics for growing the regional economy.

“The Great Lakes are a critical driver for our regional economy,” said GLC Chair Sharon M. Jackson, Deputy General Counsel for Governor Eric J. Holcomb of Indiana. “The steps recommended in this action plan will help the region leverage our freshwater resources to attract and retain talent, increase jobs, and increase quality of life equitably throughout the Great Lakes basin.”

Funding for development of the action plan was provided by the Charles Stewart Mott Foundation, the Fred A. and Barbara M. Erb Family Foundation, the Joyce Foundation, the Wege Foundation, the Fund for Lake Michigan, the Michigan Department of Environment, Great Lakes, and Energy’s Office of the Great Lakes, and the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection’s Office of the Great Lakes. Development of the action plan grew out of a 2018 study of the positive impact of the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative (GLRI) on the region’s economy.

For more information and to read the action plan, please visit: bit.ly/BlueEconomyActionPlan.


The Great Lakes Commission, led by chair Sharon M. Jackson, Deputy General Counsel for Governor Eric J. Holcomb of Indiana, is a binational government agency established in 1955 to protect the Great Lakes and the economies and ecosystems they support. Its membership includes leaders from the eight U.S. states and two Canadian provinces in the Great Lakes basin. The GLC recommends policies and practices to balance the use, development, and conservation of the water resources of the Great Lakes and brings the region together to work on issues that no single community, state, province, or nation can tackle alone. Learn more at www.glc.org.

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For media inquiries, please contact Beth Wanamaker, beth@glc.org.

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Great Lakes Commission

Great Lakes Commission

https://www.glc.org/news/be-092721

Beth Wanamaker

Michigan state conservation officials say boaters, anglers, and hunters are spreading an invasive aquatic plant. The European frog-bit has been messing up Lake Erie and Michigan coastal areas and inland lakes in the central Lower Peninsula for almost 30 years, but its now popping up in new areas. Read the full story by Michigan Radio.

Original Article

Great Lakes Commission

Great Lakes Commission

https://www.glc.org/dailynews/20210830-frogbit

Beth Wanamaker

More toxic lead pipes than any other region of the country. An unmatched legacy of abandoned, highly polluted industrial sites. Dozens of corporations chronically in trouble for poisoning air and water. All of these maladies face whomever President Joe Biden picks to lead the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency office that oversees Illinois, five other Midwestern states and the Great Lakes. Read the full story by the Chicago Tribune.

Original Article

Great Lakes Commission

Great Lakes Commission

https://www.glc.org/dailynews/20210830-epa

Beth Wanamaker

In Michigan, locals prevailed in an impassioned effort to save a local beach and dunes from development, fueled by a large state grant and more than 800 donors. Cherry Beach grew from a tiny 253 feet of Lake Michigan shoreline to 657 feet, a 404-foot expansion onto sand that locals had already been using for a century. Read the full story by the South Bend Tribune.

Original Article

Great Lakes Commission

Great Lakes Commission

https://www.glc.org/dailynews/20210830-cherry

Beth Wanamaker

Dubbed the Marysburgh Vortex, or alternatively “The Graveyard of Lake Ontario,” a small stretch of water off the shores of Ontario’s Prince Edward County has for centuries played host to shipwrecks, airplane mishaps, strange sightings and mysterious disappearances. Read the full story by Global News.

Original Article

Great Lakes Commission

Great Lakes Commission

https://www.glc.org/dailynews/20210830-vortex

Beth Wanamaker

News

Erika Jensen named executive director of the Great Lakes Commission

Ann Arbor, Mich. – The Great Lakes Commission (GLC) announced today that it has named Erika Jensen to serve as its executive director. Jensen joined the GLC in 2006 and has served as interim executive director of the agency since August 2020. She will be the GLC’s first female executive director since it was established in 1955.

“The Great Lakes Commission is thrilled to name Erika Jensen as our next executive director,” said Chair Sharon M. Jackson, Deputy General Counsel for Governor Eric J. Holcomb of Indiana. “Under Erika’s steady leadership over the past year, the GLC has effectively navigated the coronavirus pandemic while seeing considerable success in achieving its policy and program priorities. Her longstanding commitment to the Great Lakes, strategic vision, and strong relationships in the region and on Capitol Hill make her the perfect person to lead the GLC into its next era.”

As executive director, Jensen will oversee the work of the GLC, a binational government agency established in 1955 to protect and promote the resiliency of the Great Lakes and the economies and ecosystems they support. The eight U.S. states and two Canadian provinces in the Great Lakes basin are represented on the GLC by a delegation of government-appointed commissioners.

“I’m honored to take on this role and grateful to our Board and Commissioners for entrusting me with the future of the Great Lakes Commission,” said Jensen. “I look forward to working with our member states and provinces to build on our past successes, solve challenging issues facing the basin, and ensure that the Great Lakes continue to support communities across the region now and into the future.”

In her previous role, Jensen oversaw the GLC’s aquatic invasive species prevention and control program and coordinated both the Great Lakes Panel on Aquatic Nuisance Species and the Invasive Mussel Collaborative. She joined the GLC as a Sea Grant Fellow and has a master’s degree in environmental management from Duke University and a bachelor’s degree from Michigan State University.


The Great Lakes Commission, led by chair Sharon M. Jackson, Deputy General Counsel for Governor Eric J. Holcomb of Indiana, is a binational government agency established in 1955 to protect the Great Lakes and the economies and ecosystems they support. Its membership includes leaders from the eight U.S. states and two Canadian provinces in the Great Lakes basin. The GLC recommends policies and practices to balance the use, development, and conservation of the water resources of the Great Lakes and brings the region together to work on issues that no single community, state, province, or nation can tackle alone. Learn more at www.glc.org.

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For media inquiries, please contact Beth Wanamaker, beth@glc.org.

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Great Lakes Commission

Great Lakes Commission

https://www.glc.org/news/esj-072221

Beth Wanamaker

The Ohio Department of Health said Tuesday it has removed the bacteria-driven swimming advisory that had been in place at Maumee Bay State Park’s Lake Erie beach since June 17, the longest stretch this year that such an advisory had been in effect. Read the full story by the Toledo Blade.

Original Article

Great Lakes Commission

Great Lakes Commission

https://www.glc.org/dailynews/20210630-maumee

Beth Wanamaker

If Enbridge has its way, Line 3, which partly reroutes and replaces a decaying older pipeline, will bore under the Mississippi River twice as it flows north and then loops south from its source, Lake Itasca. Any leaks and spills could poison the Mississippi and more: Line 3 will cross 211 other rivers and streams, and threaten scores of lakes and wetlands in Minnesota’s choicest wild rice harvesting region, granted to Indian tribes by 19th century treaties. Read the full story by the Los Angeles Times.

Original Article

Great Lakes Commission

Great Lakes Commission

https://www.glc.org/dailynews/20210630-erosion

Beth Wanamaker

In the last year, erosion has pummeled Indiana’s Lake Michigan shoreline and the property edging it. It was, locals say, the worst erosion they’ve seen on the lake in decadesBut it’s not unprecedented. In fact, it’s part of a natural cycle that has been happening on the lake for centuries. Read the full story by the Indianapolis Star.

Original Article

Great Lakes Commission

Great Lakes Commission

https://www.glc.org/dailynews/20210630-erosion

Beth Wanamaker

Despite searing heat and heavy showers at various times this month, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration is sticking to its prediction that western Lake Erie’s Summer 2021 will be smaller than last year and relatively mild overall. . Read the full story by Toledo Blade.

Original Article

Great Lakes Commission

Great Lakes Commission

https://www.glc.org/dailynews/20210630-bloom

Beth Wanamaker

In 2016, severe storms in northern Wisconsin sparked a flood that’s linked to several deaths and caused more than $41 million in damage. Local, state and federal leaders recently marked efforts to restore one of the hardest hit areas during a grand opening celebration. They hope changes made at Iron County’s Saxon Harbor will prevent damage from more frequent, intense storms due to climate change. Read the full story by Wisconsin Public Radio.

Original Article

Great Lakes Commission

Great Lakes Commission

https://www.glc.org/dailynews/20210625-harbor

Beth Wanamaker

While invasive zebra mussels consume small plant-like organisms called phytoplankton, researchers discovered during a long-term study that zebra mussels can actually increase Microcystis, a type of phytoplankton known as “blue-green algae” or cyanobacteria, that forms harmful floating blooms. Read the full story by MSU Today.

Original Article

Great Lakes Commission

Great Lakes Commission

https://www.glc.org/dailynews/20210625-algae

Beth Wanamaker

Protests in northern Minnesota over a Canadian oil pipeline have been drawing national attention. As the fight against Enbridge Energy’s Line 3 grows larger, here’s what you need to know. Read the full story by the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel.

Original Article

Great Lakes Commission

Great Lakes Commission

https://www.glc.org/dailynews/20210625-line3

Beth Wanamaker

“Access to clean water and sanitation is not a future problem,” writes Cameron Davis, commissioner of Chicago’s Metropolitan Water Reclamation District, who served as President Obama’s Great Lakes “czar” from 2009 through 2017. “It is here and now and will exponentially increase in severity if we do not address it head-on.” Read the full story by Chicago Sun-Times.

Original Article

Great Lakes Commission

Great Lakes Commission

https://www.glc.org/dailynews/20210625-access

Beth Wanamaker

A regional effort to prevent the spread of invasive species will cross over to other states and Canada. The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, seven Great Lakes states and two Canadian provinces are partnering for the third annual Aquatic Invasive Species Landing Blitz. Read the full story by WWTI-TV – Watertown, NY.

Original Article

Great Lakes Commission

Great Lakes Commission

https://www.glc.org/dailynews/20210625-blitz

Beth Wanamaker

Each spring, melting snow and April showers fill low-lying areas with water, forming shallow pools. These vernal, or spring, pools are short-term wetlands that will be forest-fire dry by the 4th of July. Vernal pools are a highly valuable wetland habitat that is increasingly threatened across most of North America. Read the full story by Great Lakes Now.

Original Article

Great Lakes Commission

Great Lakes Commission

https://www.glc.org/dailynews/20210625-vernal

Beth Wanamaker

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers said Wednesday it would conduct an extensive review of Enbridge Energy’s plan to build an oil pipeline tunnel beneath a Great Lakes channel in Michigan, which could significantly delay the project. The tunnel would house a replacement for a portion of Enbridge’s Line 5 that crosses the bottom of the Straits of Mackinac. Read the full story by the Associated Press.

Original Article

Great Lakes Commission

Great Lakes Commission

https://www.glc.org/dailynews/20210625-tunnel

Beth Wanamaker

Canada is expanding its rules for ballast water in ships. The rules require all Canadian ships and all ships visiting Canadian ports to treat ballast water. That includes so-called “lakers,” ships which only haul cargo within the Great Lakes. Read the full story by Michigan Radio.

Original Article

Great Lakes Commission

Great Lakes Commission

https://www.glc.org/dailynews/20210625-ballast

Beth Wanamaker

News

Regional organizations urge Congress to invest in Great Lakes infrastructure

Ann Arbor, Mich. – A coalition of regional agencies, legislators, mayors, and business and environmental groups urged Congressional leaders to include key Great Lakes priorities in upcoming infrastructure legislation. The groups communicated their priorities through a joint letter following the release of President Biden’s infrastructure investment plan earlier this year and ongoing negotiations on the Hill.

“Investments in water infrastructure, commercial navigation, environmental restoration, and resilience will create jobs, foster equity for underserved communities, and strengthen the economic and environmental health of the Great Lakes region for future generations,” reads the letter. “Our agencies and organizations – representing the Great Lakes states, cities, conservation groups, ports, and business – strongly support robust investments in these areas. These investments will address longstanding basin-wide priorities while stimulating economic activity in hard-hit communities throughout our region.”

The coalition urges Congress to accelerate the bipartisan Great Lakes Restoration Initiative; invest in drinking water, wastewater, and stormwater infrastructure; ensure the Great Lakes economy, environment, and communities are resilient to the impacts of a changing climate; and strengthen Great Lakes ports and the maritime transportation system.

The priorities are endorsed by the Great Lakes CommissionGreat Lakes Fishery Commission, Healing Our Waters-Great Lakes CoalitionGreat Lakes and St. Lawrence Cities InitiativeGreat Lakes Metro Chambers CoalitionAmerican Great Lakes Ports Association, and Great Lakes-St. Lawrence Legislative Caucus.


The Great Lakes Commission, led by chair Sharon M. Jackson, Deputy General Counsel for Governor Eric J. Holcomb of Indiana, is a binational government agency established in 1955 to protect the Great Lakes and the economies and ecosystems they support. Its membership includes leaders from the eight U.S. states and two Canadian provinces in the Great Lakes basin. The GLC recommends policies and practices to balance the use, development, and conservation of the water resources of the Great Lakes and brings the region together to work on issues that no single community, state, province, or nation can tackle alone. Learn more at www.glc.org.

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For media inquiries, please contact Beth Wanamaker, beth@glc.org.

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Great Lakes Commission

Great Lakes Commission

https://www.glc.org/news/infrastructure-062421

Beth Wanamaker

News

Great Lakes aquatic invasive species are the focus of the third annual “Landing Blitz”

Ann Arbor, Mich. – Hundreds of organizations across the Great Lakes region will be coming together to educate boaters and the public about the risks of spreading aquatic invasive species (AIS) during the third annual Great Lakes AIS Landing Blitz, to be held June 26 to July 4. The event is coordinated annually among state and provincial agencies with the support of the Great Lakes Commission and partner organizations.

 As part of the Landing Blitz, volunteers will join paid inspectors at boat launches to educate boaters on how to prevent the spread of AIS, ways to identify AIS, and how to report an AIS discovery. Properly inspecting and cleaning boats, trailers and other equipment helps prevent the spread of AIS, which are recognized as one of the most significant threats to the ecological and economic health of the Great Lakes.

“More than 185 nonnative species are already established in the Great Lakes, many of which are invasive and cause harm,” said Sharon M. Jackson, chair of the Great Lakes Commission and deputy general counsel for Indiana Governor Eric Holcomb. “Progress is being made, but we must continue to work together through successful partnerships like the AIS Landing Blitz to prevent new invasions and reduce the damage from species already here.”

Last year’s Great Lakes AIS Landing Blitz reached 128,000 people at over 1,000 public and private boat landings across the region, and an additional 830,000 people engaged with online virtual content and social media about the event. This year, agencies leading the effort will host a hybrid event, continuing to reinstate in-person inspections and outreach in accordance with relevant COVID-19 public health procedures while maintaining an online presence.

“As recreation and tourism continues to open back up across the Great Lakes basin, we are excited to communicate directly with boaters at landing sites, while continuing to exercise appropriate safety procedures,” said James M. Tierney, Great Lakes Commissioner and Deputy Commissioner for Water Resources at the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation.

For more information on the Great Lakes AIS Landing Blitz, including educational materials, location, and volunteer opportunities, visit www.glc.org/blitz.


The Great Lakes Commission, led by chair Sharon M. Jackson, Deputy General Counsel for Governor Eric J. Holcomb of Indiana, is a binational government agency established in 1955 to protect the Great Lakes and the economies and ecosystems they support. Its membership includes leaders from the eight U.S. states and two Canadian provinces in the Great Lakes basin. The GLC recommends policies and practices to balance the use, development, and conservation of the water resources of the Great Lakes and brings the region together to work on issues that no single community, state, province, or nation can tackle alone. Learn more at www.glc.org.

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For media inquiries, please contact Beth Wanamaker, beth@glc.org.

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Original Article

Great Lakes Commission

Great Lakes Commission

https://www.glc.org/news/blitz-062321

Beth Wanamaker

It has been estimated that it would cost nearly US$20 million for all farms in Ohio that feed Lake Erie to reduce their nutrient pollution by 30 per cent. The benefits of a cleaner lake, meanwhile, would only recoup about half that amount. However, there’s something missing from that calculation – and it has major implications for protecting local waterways all over the world.. Read the full story by CTV News.

Original Article

Great Lakes Commission

Great Lakes Commission

https://www.glc.org/dailynews/20210524-global

Beth Wanamaker

As part of spring and fall migration, hundreds of thousands of hawks and other birds of prey follow a flight path over the Great Lakes, where wind, water and our state’s unique geography converge to create hot spots over which these birds fly in droves. Read the full story by MLive.

Original Article

Great Lakes Commission

Great Lakes Commission

https://www.glc.org/dailynews/20210524-birds

Beth Wanamaker

Our region is home to more than 20 percent of the world’s surface fresh water, including Lake Erie and the other Great Lakes. Our region also offers exceptional economic opportunity, with an economy that generates about $6 trillion annually. Read the full story by the Plain Dealer.

Original Article

Great Lakes Commission

Great Lakes Commission

https://www.glc.org/dailynews/20210524-cleve

Beth Wanamaker

For anglers journeying to Lake Erie, walleye and yellow perch long have been main drivers of their efforts. Yet for reasons largely mysterious walleye currently are booming, and yellow perch seem to be going bust. Read the full story by the Columbus Dispatch.

Original Article

Great Lakes Commission

Great Lakes Commission

https://www.glc.org/dailynews/20210524-walleye

Beth Wanamaker

A new study involves placing transmitters on hen mallards in the Great Lakes region. The tracking devices will allow researchers to document hen movements and habitat use, estimate the number that return to the same breeding, staging and wintering areas and estimate survival and productivity rates. Some Great Lakes states have shown declines in mallard populations in recent years. Read the full story by Milwaukee Journal Sentinel.

Original Article

Great Lakes Commission

Great Lakes Commission

https://www.glc.org/dailynews/20210524-duck

Beth Wanamaker